H Kain Diath K [Romanized]; The Greek Testament, with English Notes, Critical, Philological, and Exegetical, Partly Selected and Arranged from the Best Commentators, Ancient and Modern, But Chiefly Original. the Whole Being

H Kain Diath K [Romanized]; The Greek Testament, with English Notes, Critical, Philological, and Exegetical, Partly Selected and Arranged from the Best Commentators, Ancient and Modern, But Chiefly Original. the Whole Being

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1837 edition. Excerpt: ... and roost modern Expositors suppose) mean u fellowship of the Spirit." See Note on Rom. xv. 30. and on 2 Cor. xiii. 14. Though, as there is no Article, almost all the recent Commentators, perhaps rightly, render it consensu) or conjunctio animorum. 2. s-Xrp. ft. T. tp'(v "fulfil ye my joy," i. e. give me full cause tor rejoicing, or complete the joy I felt in converting you, and have since felt; namely by cultivating the mutual agreement in doctrine, and concord of mind before enjoined. With respect to rb ahrb pmv. and rd 7v tpnov., they are by Phot., Heinr., and Schleusn. supposed to be synonymous. And so they are conjoined in Polyb. 441. (cited by Wets.) lyovrtc fa wi Tjvto iravrtf. and Aristid. p. 569. fa mil ralrb foovohvrts. On the other hand, Grot., Kypke, Mich., Storr., and Rosenm., suppose that the former denotes consent in doctrine, the latter, social concord. Bp. Middleton, however, thinks that the Article before fa cannot be explained without supposing some kind of reference. This reference, he maintains, is to what immediately follows, fttjSiv tear' tptOri'iv f) Kcvo&otyav, as if the Apostle had said, " minding the one thing, viz. &c." "An interpretation (says he) favored by the Vulg. id ipsum sentientes, Nihil per contentionem usque per inanem gloriam" But what principally, he thinks, confirms this opinion, is the construction of the sentence following, nn&h tear' lpt8dav, which in having no verb assumes the form of a proverbial admonition, such as might be made a subject of reference. All this, however, seems not a little far-fetched, and straining a point to support a theory; which, after all, may be as well maintained in another way. VOL. II. What the Bp. calls...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 394 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 703g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236962273
  • 9781236962270