Gustavus Adolphus; A History of the Art of War from Its Revival After the Middle Ages to the End of the Spanish Succession War, with a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of the Great Swede, and of the Most Famous Campaign of Volume 2

Gustavus Adolphus; A History of the Art of War from Its Revival After the Middle Ages to the End of the Spanish Succession War, with a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of the Great Swede, and of the Most Famous Campaign of Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...relief by John Sobieski and Charles of Lorraine was one of the notable feats of arms of the seventeenth century, it should scarce find a place in these pages, for there is no special lesson to be learned from it, nor was any one of the actors in the splendid drama a captain of the greatest note. It was, however, in this siege that Prince Eugene, who has done so much for the art of war, played one of his earliest, though a modest role, at the age of twenty. In 1661 a war broke out between the emperor and the Turks, to which an end was put in the splendid victory of St. Gothard by Montecuculi. In 1682 a second war broke out, fostered openly by the Hungarians and secretly by the French. In 1683 the Turks invaded Hungary and laid siege 646 THE TURKS THREATEN VIENNA. to Vienna. Their army, two hundred thousand strong, was under command of Kara Mustapha, grand vizier, to whom was intrusted the old green eagle-standard of the Prophet as a badge of success; and on May 12 this force left Belgrade on its march to Vienna. Aware of its destination, the emperor, Leopold I., called on the princes of the empire for assistance, and made a treaty with John Sobieski, king of Poland, Vienna-Ofen Country. to come to his aid with forty thousand men, the emperor promising sixty thousand men to join him. The imperial army was mustered in May at Presburg under Charles of Lorraine, a soldier tried in the school of adversity, robbed of his inheritance by the French, and a connection and devoted servant of the emperor. It numbered thirty-three thousand men, and with this handful Charles was holden to defend the land, and to garrison Presburg, Raab and Comorn. The Turks were already near Ofen, and on June 25 Charles intrenched himself in a camp between the Raab and the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236489055
  • 9781236489050