Gustavus Adolphus; A History of the Art of War from Its Revival After the Middle Ages to the End of the Spanish Succession War, with a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of the Great Swede, and of the Most Famous Campaign of Volume 1

Gustavus Adolphus; A History of the Art of War from Its Revival After the Middle Ages to the End of the Spanish Succession War, with a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of the Great Swede, and of the Most Famous Campaign of Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... male was ruthlessly slaughtered, except Kniphausen and three other officers. Outrage of every kind ran riot. Nothing was spared, --as a species of revenge for the capture of Demmin and Colberg; but it was a sad contrast to the recent conduct of the Swedes under parallel conditions. BACK TO MAGDEBURG. 209 It did the imperialists no strategic good, for Tilly saw no advantage in advancing farther. He was not a man to be encouraged by success, nor had he any surplus enterprise to boast of. Friedland is a bare twenty miles from Neu-Brandenburg. Why neither Bane'r nor Baudissin came to Kniphausen's aid is not explained. The error may have lain in the king's failure to guess Tilly's rather blind design, and in orders a record of which is not on hand. When Horn ascertained the fall of Neu-Brandenburg, he withdrew the troops from Friedland, leaving only a garrison, broke down the bridge at Treptow, and retired to Demmin, to protect the approaches to Stralsund and Greifswalde by holding the fords of the Peene and Trebel. Tilly, on weighing the difficulty of marching on either Stralsund, Greifswalde or Anklam, and fearing that, by a sudden dash, Gustavus might seize the passage of the Havel, concluded to retire to Neu-Ruppin. When he did so, Horn returned to Friedland. A small compensation for the Neu-Brandenburg disaster shortly occurred when the rhinegrave met a detachment of a thousand horse on its way from Rostock to the imperial army, and completely destroyed it. Count Pappenheim had made to the elector of Bavaria many complaints of Tilly's dilatoriness, and about this time there came orders to Tilly to let everything lapse which interfered with the capture of Magdeburg. No doubt Tilly would have retired as it was, for without reason he became...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236741005
  • 9781236741004