Guide to the West Indies, Madeira, Mexico, New Orleans, Northern South-America, &C., Compiled from Documents Specially Furnished by the Agents of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, the Board of Trade, and Other Authentic Sources

Guide to the West Indies, Madeira, Mexico, New Orleans, Northern South-America, &C., Compiled from Documents Specially Furnished by the Agents of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, the Board of Trade, and Other Authentic Sources

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1847 edition. Excerpt: ...use of their internal resources. This neglect--for it is said that there was only one plough in the whole colony in 1827may be ascribed to the facility with which supplies are received from America, and also to the great varieties of excellent fish with which the shores abound, withdrawing the attention of numbers of the lower orders from the cultivation of the soil. The soil is very fertile, and the esculcnt plants and roots of Europe, as well as the citron, sour orange, lemon, and lime grow spontaneously in great luxuriance, and peaches, and musk melons grow to perfection in the early summer season. The climate is adapted for the grape, but the inhabitants pay no attention to this fruit. Medical plants, such as castor, aloe, and jalap, grow to great perfection without culture. " Within the last year," says the writer of the Bermuda Almanac for 1842, " an attempt was made to revive the culture of the medicinal aloe, which we are glad to state has given promise of success; 150 pounds weight were manufactured. It is understood that this article in its manufactured state, is worth, in London, 50 sterling for 100 pounds' weight." Almost all the occupiers of land sow a small quantity of barley; but the novel manner of reaping, gives rather an unfavourable idea of-the state of agriculture in that quarter. An old woman, furnished with a basket and a pair of scissors cuts off the heads of the grain, leaving the stalk erect, which is afterwards converted into bonnets. Arrow-root, as before noticed, is the chief article of export, and this has encreased from the value of 888, in 1831, to 5,833, in 1841. It is but justice, however, to say that laudable exertions are now being made to improve the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236801857
  • 9781236801852