A Guide to the Third and Fourth Egyptian Rooms; Predynastic Antiquities, Mummied Birds and Animals, Portrait Statues, Figures of Gods, Tools, Implements and Weapons, Scarabs, Amulets, Jewellery, and Other Objects Connected with the

A Guide to the Third and Fourth Egyptian Rooms; Predynastic Antiquities, Mummied Birds and Animals, Portrait Statues, Figures of Gods, Tools, Implements and Weapons, Scarabs, Amulets, Jewellery, and Other Objects Connected with the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...his right hand to his mouth in the attitude common to children. No. 11,525. No. 67. Bronze seated figure of Harpocrates, wearing on his head horns, plumes, and a disk, which are the attributes of several solar gods. No. 26,296. No. 68. Bronze seated figure of Heru-sa-Aset, i.e., "Horus, son of Isis." No. 998. No. 69. Gilded seated bronze figure of Heru-pa-neb-ta, i.e., " Horus, the lord of the world," wearing the triple crown. No. 11,495-Nos. 70, 71. Glazed porcelain amulets, with figures of Horus, Isis, and Nephthys. Nos. 913, 26.317. No. 72. Porcelain hollow-work figures of six goddesses, viz., Hathor, Nephthys, Isis, Mut, Tefnut, Bast. No. 929. Between the Saite and Roman periods, i.e., between B.C. 600 and B.C. 20, the Egyptians employed as talismans for the protection of houses and other buildings small rounded stone stelae, with projections at the feet, whereon stood figures of Horus in the form of the "aged god who reneweth his youth." To this class of objects the name Cippi of Horus has been given. The god stands with each foct on the head of a crocodile, and in his hands he grasps serpents, scorpions, gazelle, etc., which typify powers of evil; on his right and left are symbols of Upper and Lower Egypt. Above his head is the head of Bes, who here symbolizes the aged Sun-god, who becomes young again under the form of Horus. On each side of the sculptured figure of the god is a series of mythological scenes, all of which have reference to the power possessed by Horus over noxious animals and reptiles and evil spirits. On the back and sides of the cippi are inscribed series of magical texts, which usually tell the story of how Horus was restored to life after he had been stung to death by a scorpion. No. 73....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236554329
  • 9781236554321