Guide to the Materials for American History, to 1783, in the Public Records Office of Great Britain Volume 90, PT. 1, V. 2

Guide to the Materials for American History, to 1783, in the Public Records Office of Great Britain Volume 90, PT. 1, V. 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...ships or vessels going out _of Great __ Britain in the years named, and give age, quality, occupation, employment, and former residence, to what port or place they proposed to go, by what ship or vessel they were to sail, with what master, and on what account or for what purpose they left the country. The lists were drawn up in response to a letter from the Treasury, Dec. 8, 1773, and as here preserved are imperfect, lacking entries for Apr. 13-18, 27May 9, 1774, and Nov. 7-12, 1775. They have been printed in part in the New England Genealogical and Historical Register ( 1911), but without adequate appreciation of their importance or significance. The largest group of names includes redemptioners and indented servants going to Virginia, Maryland, Philadelphia, New York, and (a few) North Carolina, the total number of which runs into the thousands. The servants were indented for four, five, and six years, and in certain cases the redemptioners rendered themselves liable to a seven years' service. The second largest group includes emigrants sailing from Yorkshire and other north of England ports going to Nova Scotia, Virginia, and New York. The reasons assigned for the migration are " rents being raised by their landlords," " provisions and every necessary of life being so high," " the small farms being absorbed into large ones," and " they cannot support their families "; or " to settle," " to work as clerk," to obtain " better employment," " to travel," " to see friends," etc. In these lists the port of departure for America was generally London, Bristol, or Hull. In Sept., 1775, a considerable body of Germans went to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 242 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 440g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236808134
  • 9781236808134