A Guide to the Exhibition Illustrating Greek and Roman Life; With a Frontispiece and Two Hundred and Forty-Two Illustrations Volume 2

A Guide to the Exhibition Illustrating Greek and Roman Life; With a Frontispiece and Two Hundred and Forty-Two Illustrations Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...normal Greek house of Hellenistic times, that of one excavated at Priene on the west coast of Asia Minor may be given. The ground plan (fig. 93) shows a central court B withdrawn from the noise and bustle of the streets, and only c. Aristocr. 207. approached by means of a long corridor A. Before the main living-room D (oikos) is the recess or portico C, facing south so as to catch the rays of the winter sun. Its roof was supported in front by two Doric columns. This is the prostas or pastas, so arranged that, as Xenophon says,1 the low winter sun would shine into it, while it would afford shade from the high summer sun. The different portions of the house inhabited by the men and women respectively cannot be clearly distinguished. Possibly the women occupied an upper storey. The small dimensions of many of the rooms, a characteristic feature of the ancient house, should be noted. Fig. 94 gives a reconstruction of this house, indicating its original appearance.2 In its general form it harmonises with the description of the Greek house given by the Eoman architect Vitruvius.3 The Roman house.--This in its final development assumed a form closely resembling that of the Greek house just described. The early Italian house, however, consisted merely of an oblong chamber, with a small opening in the roof for the admission of light and emission of smoke. This chamber was called an atrium, perhaps because walls and roof were black (atcr) with soot from the smoke of the fire. Gradually the opening in the roof became larger, while the beams of the roof were sloped downwards so as to conduct the rain into an oblong basin in the floor below, called the impluvium. As early as the third century B.C. the atrium was no longer the sole living-room of the family, ..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236507703
  • 9781236507709