A Guide to the Anglo-Saxon Tongue; A Grammar After Erasmus Rask Extracts in Prose and Verse with Notes, Etc. for the Use of Learners and an Appendix

A Guide to the Anglo-Saxon Tongue; A Grammar After Erasmus Rask Extracts in Prose and Verse with Notes, Etc. for the Use of Learners and an Appendix

By (author) 

List price: US$19.99

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...of the most important words in each line of a couplet, two called sub-letters riming thus together in the first line, and answering to a third called the chief letter in the second. The first line has often but one sub-letter and never more than two; the second never more than one chief letter. The length of the lines varies much, each however must contain at least two emphatic or root syllables, with one or more uneinphatic, that is prefixes, terminations, &c.: few lines have less than four syllables, two emphatic, and two unemphatic, and some (1) Alliieration is found in the Latin poetry of the middle ages, sometimes combined with line and final rime, and syllabic metre; it was used more or less in England along with other kinds of rime till a late period, and is still usual in the Scandinavian tongues. The Vision of Piers Plouliman (1350) is a long and regular specimen of English alliterative poetry, on the above rules. For a full account of the A.S. versification, see Rask'a Grammar, pp. 136--68. have as many as eight or nine, or even more, ample (1): For ex How befell it you on your voyage dear Beowulf, when thou suddenly far oft' determinedst warfare to seek orer the salt water, battle at Heorot? Hast thou then Hrothgar against his known plague ought booted, the famous prince? Here the first couplet has in the first line two subletters, the I in Zomp and Zade, answering to the chief letter, the Z in Zeofa in the second. The third line has but one sub-letter, the f in /aeringa which rimes with (1; Beowulf, ed. Kemble 1. 3969--79. () Limpan (III..) to happen. (3) Ladu (III.3.)h'Sau to travel, journey, chiefly by sea. (4) Sffic (II. 3.) hence sack of a town. (s) Hild (II. 3.) battle, war. (6) The palace of Hitfthgar prince of a Danish...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236576896
  • 9781236576897