The Great Terrestrial Reservoir, the Ocean, and the Inhabitants of the Mighty Deep. Great Herds of Game. Forest and Jungle Shooting. Hunting and Stalking on Plains. Wildfowl and Wildfowl Shooting. Fishing. Index

The Great Terrestrial Reservoir, the Ocean, and the Inhabitants of the Mighty Deep. Great Herds of Game. Forest and Jungle Shooting. Hunting and Stalking on Plains. Wildfowl and Wildfowl Shooting. Fishing. Index

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ..."occur from time to time, in every sportsman's experience, in which it seems almost impossible to dispatch a wounded beast, except by a shot in the brain or vertebrae. The wounded animal seems in these cases quite impervious to all sense of pain, being apparently in a state of semi-consciousness after the first shot; the shock of each subsequent shot seeming to have no further effect." An animal in this state may therefore be regarded as living in a sort of waking-sleep or trance. We must venture to disagree with this opinion in so far as the state of semi-consciousness is concerned, in order to point out that in our opinion this condition need not necessarily affect the mental powers, but merely paralyzes the sense of pain, leaving the mind in the human subject in many cases quite clear; and the same in the case of the instinct of the animal (if Big Game Shooting (Badminton Library), 1894, Vol. i., pp. 202-3 (Mr. F. ackson's paper). 2 7 8 PAINLESS WOUNDS. that term be preferred to that of "mind "). A dangerous animal therefore, in this state may be quite as dangerous to go near as when it was unwounded; so may a human adversary; and a savage beast will probably charge with quite as clear a sense of what it is doing in the wounded, as in the unhurt state; indeed if badly wounded, it will be apt to show less fear of danger, because it believes escape by flight to be impossible. So will a desperate man, who believes 'capture means death. The sense of pain however being to a great extent in abeyance in such cases, we desire to point out to soldiers and others, should they sustain a severe wound, how desirable it is for them that any surgical operation the nature of their case may require should be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 164 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 304g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236752406
  • 9781236752406