The Great Rebellion of 1861; Twelve Months' History of the United States, Showing What a Republic Can Do Skirmishes and Battles, What the Rebels Have Done to Destroy the Union, the Lessons of the Year, Etc., Etc

The Great Rebellion of 1861; Twelve Months' History of the United States, Showing What a Republic Can Do Skirmishes and Battles, What the Rebels Have Done to Destroy the Union, the Lessons of the Year, Etc., Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ...which scattered their cavalry with shell, and drove the infantry in disorder into the woods, from which they did not rally, and at dusk McClellan's men withdrew in good order. General Banks, commander of the department of Maryland, appointed George R. Dodge marshal of police of Baltimore, and removed the military from the streets, which had been stationed there on the appointment of a provost marshal. 11th. The Senate of the United States expelled Senators James M. Mason and R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Thomas L. Clingman and Thomas Bragg, of North Carolina; Louis T. Wigfall and J. W. Hemphill, of Texas; Charles B. Mitchell and William K. Sebastian, of Arkansas; and A. 0. P. Nicholson, of Tennessee. The President of the United States approved the bill remitting or refunding the duties on arms imported by States to be used in suppressing the rebellion. A battle was fought at Rich Mountain, two miles east of Roaring Run, Virginia, where the enemy, numbering about three thousand men, in command of Colonel Pegram, were strongly intrenched. About three o'clock in the morning, General Rosecrans, with a portion of the eighth, tenth, and thirteenth Indiana, and nineteenth Ohio regiments, belonging to General McClellan's division, after a very difficult march of seven or eight miles, cutting a road through the woods, succeeded in surrounding the enemy at about three o'clock in the afternoon. A desperate fight immediately ensued, lasting about an hour and a half, resulting in a loss of one hundred and thirty-five of the enemy. They retreated precipitately, leaving behind six cannon, a large number of horses, wagons, camp equipage, &c. The loss on the Union side was about twenty killed and forty wounded. A severe shock of an earthquake was felt in Canada, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236657810
  • 9781236657817