The Great Problem; The Higher Ministry of Nature Viewed in the Light of Modern Science, and as an Aid to Advanced Christian Philosophy

The Great Problem; The Higher Ministry of Nature Viewed in the Light of Modern Science, and as an Aid to Advanced Christian Philosophy

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1872 edition. Excerpt: ...with the lowest, and ascended. What mere non-intelligent causation could produce the like?" With the opinions of Spencer and Darwin and others on the causes or factors of Evolution, the case is very different. When Mr. Spencer asks, and endeavours to answer the question, " How is Organic Evolution caused?" he assigns the causes to (1) External Factors, and (2) Internal Factors. Amongst the former there are astronomical and geological changes, meteorologic and organic agencies, and others all at work from without on each species - Mind in Nature," by H. J. Clark. New York, 1865. of organization. Amongst Internal Factors are certain principal terms which cannot be popularly explained in a limited space--such as Direct and Indirect Equilibration. All the factors co-operate in effecting the evolution. Those universal laws of the re-distribution of matter and motion, to which things in general conform, are conformed to by all living things; whether considered in their individual histories, in their histories as species, or in their aggregate history." " The progressive inner changes, for which we find a cause in the continuous outer changes, conform so far as we can trace them, to that universal law of the instability of the homogeneous which is manifested throughout evolution in general. We see that in organisms, as in all other things, the exposure of different parts to different kinds and amounts of incident forces, has necessitated their differentiation; and that for the like reason, aggregates of individuals have been lapsing into varieties, and species, and genera, and classes. We also see that in each type of organism, as in the aggregate of types, the multiplication of effects has continually aided this transition from a more homogeneous...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236664264
  • 9781236664266