Grasses and Forage Plants; A Practical Treatise Comprising Their Natural History Comparative Nutritive Value Methods of Cultivating, Cutting, and Curing

Grasses and Forage Plants; A Practical Treatise Comprising Their Natural History Comparative Nutritive Value Methods of Cultivating, Cutting, and Curing

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...these, in decaying, constantly increase the fertility of the soil, because they not only restore to it the inorganic substances which they took from it, but many others which they drew from the atmosphere, and embodied in their leaves, and stalks, and roots. The atmosphere is known to be full of the very elements which it is most desirable to secure and turn to our own use; and there is no way in which the farmer can avail himself of these invaluable aids so surely as by embodying them in the form of green vegetable masses, and turning them fresh beneath the surface, where they soon decay, and are ready to nourish other vegetable bodies, that is, to produce crops which are of money value. Green manuring has rarely, or never, failed of producing satisfactory results, when it has been economically and judiciously applied; and its value as the true mode of fertilizing the earth has been sufficiently proved in practice, in cases where the farmer has ploughed in-clover, buckwheat, oats, &c. The result or effect of green manuring is well known, and the truth of the system is sufficiently shown in the fact that it is strictly in accordance with nature. But our ordinary modes have usually been too expensive, either on account of the cost of the seed of the clovers or other large seeds, or in causing the loss of 4he crop for the year, that is, in fallowing; or in failing to secure the full benefit of the system, from the use of too few varieties or species of plants, and consequently having too small a mass of vegetable matter; yet, notwithstanding this failure to secure the highest advanGREEN VEGETABLE MASSES. 211 tages of which the system is susceptible, the farmer has, by means of turning in green crops, increased the amount and depth of the mould in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123654739X
  • 9781236547392