A Grammar of the Hindustani Language in the Oriental and Roman Character, to Which Is Added a Copious Selection of Easy Extracts for Reading, in the Persi-Arabic and Devanagari Characters, Forming a Complete Introduction to the

A Grammar of the Hindustani Language in the Oriental and Roman Character, to Which Is Added a Copious Selection of Easy Extracts for Reading, in the Persi-Arabic and Devanagari Characters, Forming a Complete Introduction to the

By (author) 

List price: US$15.85

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1846 edition. Excerpt: ...of the feminine gender in all present and past participles, as well as in all adjectives purely-Indian ending in l a. 88 ' Compounds. Compound Words. 60. In all works written in the Urdu or mixed dialect of Hindustani, a vast number of compound words from the Persian may be met with in almost every page. These are generally formed by the union of two substantives, or of an adjective with a substantive. Many of them are given in dictionaries, but as there is no limit to their number, the student must not place much reliance on that source. A few weeks' study of Persian will make the matter clearer than any body of rules we could lay down on the subject; we shall therefore notice here only the more important compounds, referring the student for further information to our Persian Grammar, edit. 1844. Substantives. a. A Persian or Arabic substantive with its regimen is of frequent occurrence in Hindustani; as, L, .: I lb-i-_lzai_z/zit, 'water of immortalityj' Uiiloixiajf dida, i-denish, 'the eye of discernment;' J rzi-e-zamin, ' the face of the earth.' In a similar form a Persian substantive with its adjective occasionally occurs; as, are mard-i-nikii, ' a good man;' ggle pile Compounds. 89 In compounds of this kind, the two words are generally written separate, though they may also be united into one. These are upon the whole like our own compounds, book-stall, cofi'eehouse, newspaper, &c., of which it is customary to write some with a hyphen between, others quite separate, and a few united into one word. c. There is a class of verbal Nouns, not very numerous, con sisting, lst. Of two contracted infinitives, connected with the I literally, ' speaking and hearing; J...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236823109
  • 9781236823106