A Grammar of the Hindi Language; In Which Are Treated the Standard Hindi, Braj, and the Eastern Hindi of the Ramayan of Tulsi Das, Also the Colloqui

A Grammar of the Hindi Language; In Which Are Treated the Standard Hindi, Braj, and the Eastern Hindi of the Ramayan of Tulsi Das, Also the Colloqui

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 edition. Excerpt: ...is seating him in (his) lap'; SJJT51 M4 WTBW . 'death comes near'; $T OTC ITT? mn, 'I do not find a place'; TTT laTtf?T, 'the queen was crying'; tl irnH ft, 'I have come'; 35 srnh tru, 'he may have come'; 5f 3TT fl TH4i t, 'he had walked for some distanoe', etc, etc. 384. The passive construction of the Perfect tenses of transitives with the case of the agent, is regularly employed in Braj as in standard Hindi. But it should be noticed that while is often used with the case of the agent, it is also often omitted, both in poetry, and, more rarely, in prose; and the noun or pronoun is used in its oblique form, where such a form exists. Thus, Wl WR inT TOOT, 'he settled a city'; 9JTTI TOT 951TT, 'the crow cawed'. In a French Braj translation of the Hitopades a special inflection of the substantive in this construction occurs, as, e.g., jfj 5RT%, 'the hare said', f where =sfl is the inflected case of the agent, from TOT. 385. A number of common verbs assume peculiar forms in Braj which may be well noted here. (1) The root of the substantive verb, frit, 'to be', in the 2nd form of the absol. fut., the infinitive in Si, and the conjunctive participle, becomes J. Thus, the absol. fut. becomes ft, f, etc.; Vid. Prof. Do Tassy's 'Chresiomalhie', Paris, 1849. t This is ovidently identical with the Marwari agent case termination. Vid. 132, o. the infin. %th, and the conj. part. J. Ssfi, etc. In the perf. part, and all its tenses, wh, (masc. infl. WJorOT, fem. wift, or w, ) is the common suhstitute for WW. The same form with only the change of 4h to #T is universally employed in Kanauji, where it is even shortened to wifr or ifr. In one place in a Braj work I have noted a perf., (Sk. jra, ) 'was', for..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 118 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236654919
  • 9781236654915