Government Control of Railways in Great Britain; Memoranda Submitted to the Committee on Interstate Commerce, United States Senate, Sixty-Fifth Congress, Second Session, Relative to the Government Control of Railways in Great Britain in

Government Control of Railways in Great Britain; Memoranda Submitted to the Committee on Interstate Commerce, United States Senate, Sixty-Fifth Congress, Second Session, Relative to the Government Control of Railways in Great Britain in

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...was authorized after the passage of the act.1 % (b) Opinion as to terms.--In a book published the year before the war broke out a British railway authority,2 while admitting that ' some of them the railway companies are said to have even resigned themselves to nationalization," expressed the belief that "no Government could be so mad as to take over 22,000 miles of railway at a stroke. The operation will have to be carried through by installments." The period of Government control, however, has accustomed the Government and the public to consider the British railway system as a unit. Among the nationalization suggestions made during the war proposals to take the railways over piecemeal have not been conspicuous. As to the price to be paid for the railways, the Investors' Review,5 in commenting on that provision of the act of 1844 whereby the railways are to receive extra compensation for "prospects," caustically remarks that their only prospects are increased expenses and the like, and that these should indeed be taken into account. Government ownership conferences demand that the railways shall be bought "at their real value." It is generally admitted that "the terms may be difficult to arrange, and, in any case, there is sure to be considerable delay," even though the proprietors may be willing to sell out "on any reasonable terms." No doubt, if the acquisition of the railways is seriously considered by the Government the entire matter of compensation will be threshed out before the reconstruction committee on railways already referred to,5 whose powers are broad and inclusive.6 ' i Railway Regulation Act, 1844, 7 and 8 Vict. 3. 85, 3. 1 Lawson, W. E., British railways....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236852095
  • 9781236852090