The Gondola Maker
35%
off

The Gondola Maker

By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 4 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

Laura Morelli holds a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University, where she was a Bass Writing Fellow and Mellon Doctoral Fellow. She authored a column for National Geographic Traveler called "The Genuine Article" and contributes pieces about authentic travel to national magazines and newspapers. Laura has been featured on CNN Radio, Travel Today with Peter Greenberg, The Frommers Travel Show, and in USA TODAY, Departures, House & Garden Magazine, Traditional Home, the Denver Post, Miami Herald, The Chicago Tribune, and other media. Recently her art history lesson, "What's the difference between art and craft?" was produced and distributed by TED-Ed. Laura has taught college-level art history at Trinity College in Rome, as well as at Northeastern University, Merrimack College, St. Joseph College, and the College of Coastal Georgia. Laura has lived in five countries, including four years in Italy. Laura Morelli is the author of the guidebook series that includes Made in Italy, Made in France, and Made in the Southwest, all published by Rizzoli / Universe. The Gondola Maker, a historical coming-of-age story about the heir to a gondola boatyard in 16th-century Venice, is her first work of fiction.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 298 pages
  • 152.4 x 228.6 x 22.86mm | 498.95g
  • Laura Morelli
  • United States, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 098936710X
  • 9780989367103
  • 482,531

Our customer reviews

Did I enjoy this book: It was ok in its best moments. If I hadnâ??t agreed to read this book to write a review, Iâ??d have stopped reading at chapter 17 â?? thatâ??s the moment the story went way off the rails for me. I was reading the story from the first person point of view of a gondola maker. Heâ??s pretty much an every day guy except he caught his fatherâ??s boat on fire and ran away from his family. Or at least thatâ??s what I thought the story was about. In Chapter 17, a new character jumps in the novel to show us his life from the third person point of view. This guy is some pervert who pays men to let him rape their daughters and then paint pictures of them. It was like fictional whiplash. Where did that come from? And while she had minimal grammatical issues, this already awkward chapter said, â??After the fact, she is no longer be marriageable anyway.â?? Major unexplained point of view shifts coupled with a typo that makes the sentence nonsensical killed the story right there in Chapter 17. Since I agreed to review the book I kept reading, but from that point on I was grouchy. A grouchy reviewer notices sentences like the one that began Chapter 25, â??Morning sunbeams streak down the canal, imparting radiance to even the most dingy facades, and I feel I can smell the arrival of spring.â?? A run-on sentence with two unrelated topics? Now Iâ??m really grouchy. Fiction is hard. This read more like non-fiction with flowery language. We need dynamic heroes, revolting villains, conflict, conflict, and did I mention conflict? Would I recommend it: No. As reviewed by Belinda at Every Free Chance Books. Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.show more
by Chrissy