Goldsmith's History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George II with a Continuation to the Present Time

Goldsmith's History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Death of George II with a Continuation to the Present Time

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...consider with ntten-17. Su'icidc, s. the primo of destroying one's tion. aelf. 1. (A.D, 1684.) The loss of Shaftesbury, though it retarded the views of the conspirators, did not suppress them. A council of six was elected, consisting of Monmouth, Russell, Essex, Howard, Algernon Sidney, and John Hampden, grandson to the great man Of that name. 2, Such, together with the duke of Argyle, were the leaders of this conspiracy. But there was also a set of subordinate conspirators, who frequently met together, and carried on projects quite unknown to Monmouth and his council. Among these men were colonel Rumsey, an old republican officer, together with lieutenant-colonel Walcpt, of the same stamp; Goodenougb, under-sheriff of London, a zealous and noted party-man; Ferguson, an independent minister: and several attorneys, merchants, and tradesmen of London. 3. But colonel Rumsey and Ferguson were the only persons that had access to the great leaders of the conspiracy.--These men in their meetings embraced the most desperate resolutions. They proposed to assassinate the king on his way to Newmarket; Rumbal, one of the party, possessed a farm upon that road called the Rye-house, and from thence the' conspiracy was denominated the Rye-house Plot. 4. They deliberated upon a scheme of stopping the king's coach, by overturning a cart on the highway at this place, and shooting him through the hedges. The house in which the king lived at Newmarket took fire accidentally, and he was obliged to leave Newmarket eight days sooner than was expected, to which circumstance his safety was ascribed. 5. Among the conspirators was one Keiling, who finding himself in danger of a prosecution for arresting the lord-mayor of London, resolved to earn his pardon by discovering...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 204 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236593030
  • 9781236593030