Gold and Silver; Comprising an Economic History of Mining in the United States, the Geographical and Geological Occurrence of the Precious Metals, with Their Mineralogical Associations, History and Description of Methods of Mining and

Gold and Silver; Comprising an Economic History of Mining in the United States, the Geographical and Geological Occurrence of the Precious Metals, with Their Mineralogical Associations, History and Description of Methods of Mining and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...However, the average of the whole bank is between 10 and 35 cents per cubic yard. Large scale operation can handle gravels averaging 2 cents, although 5 cents is usually considered the lower limit. Gravels yielding from 2 to 7 cents per cubic yard can be worked with profit by dredges. The size of the gold varies between wide limits: the finest grains (colors) require several thousand to make a cent, while many slugs and small nuggets have been found. The placer-mining districts of the Blue Mountains are as follows; bars on the Snake River; Eagle Creek Mountains; Sparta; and an area extending from Connor Creek by Weatherby, Chicken Creek, Rye Valley, Humbolt, Clark's Creek and Malheur; the camps of Auburn, Pocahontas and Minersville, west of Baker City; and the headwaters of Powder and Burnt rivers and Granite Creek, which include the districts of Sumpter, Granite, Robinsville, Bonanza and Gimlet.1 1 Min. and Sci. Press, Vol. 88, p. 299. In the Susanville district in Elk Creek the gold occurs in two or three channels or gutters which have a depth of one to three feet, the channel proper being nearly level and fully 100 feet wide.2 In Josephine County placer-mining was inaugurated shortly after similar work was begun in California. The principal localities being on the Applegate, Illinois, Josephine and Galice rivers. Here as in California, the richest deposits occur in the dead river channels. As late as 1902 there were 150 hydraulicing operations in the county. The gold is fairly coarse and numerous nuggets ranging in value from $1 to $50 have been obtained. Waldo, Althouse, Galice and Grave, areas in the four corners of the county, have proven most productive.3 The gravel deposits of the old river channels in southern Oregon, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 260 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 472g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236568451
  • 9781236568458