The Gold Digger; A Visit to the Gold Fields of Australia in February, 1852 Together with Much Useful Information for Intending Emigrants

The Gold Digger; A Visit to the Gold Fields of Australia in February, 1852 Together with Much Useful Information for Intending Emigrants

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ... man is employed in dashing water on the sieve from a dipper with a long handle. The cradle having been placed in a slanting position (with the sieve end higher than the other), the particles of gold, if any, fall by their superior gravity into the bottom, where they are arrested by the bars, or ledges, already named, and the muddy water runs out at the foot of the cradle. The gold, being generally mixed with grit, small fragments of ironstone, and other heavy substances, is now put into a large tin shallow dish, and carefully washed. There are at all the diggings several men who can earn about 21. a day, each man, by carting for others the earth in bags to the washing-place. The usual charge is 1/. for carrying twelve three-bushel bags nearly full of earth from four to five miles. For a strong and well-fed horse two trips of this extent, and with such a load as I have now named, would be an easy day's work. A man, with a good horse and cart, may thus earn in a year what would be deemed a little fortune to a poor man in England. It is proper, however, that I should here remind you that in case you break any part of your cart or harness, the charge for repairing it on the gold fields is enormous. To mend and set an axle is 41. To cut and close a pair of tires is 51. To shoe a horse is 21., or 10s. for each shoe. Everything in the shape of labour bears there a high price. The laundress charges 12s. per dozen for washing your shirts; and the doctor will not walk from his own tent to the next tent, to look at some unfortunate digger who met with an accident, without a fee of 51. sterling being paid to him in gold. Considering the liability of the diggers to various accidents, arising partly from the closeness to each other, and the great depth of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236606353
  • 9781236606358