God of Abraham

God of Abraham

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Description

Goodman shows how human values illuminate the idea of God, which in turn sheds light on our value concerns. Drawing on a wealth of traditional and philosophical material including Jewish sources, he shows how an adequate understanding of the interplay of values with monotheism can dissolve many of the longstanding problems of natural theology and ethics and guide us to a genuinely humanistic moral and social philosophy.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 384 pages
  • 162.1 x 237.7 x 30mm | 726.57g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • New
  • 0195083121
  • 9780195083125

Review quote

Lenn Goodman's God of Abraham is a remarkable book of vast scope, compelling rigor, and great eloquence ... Goodman traverses, masters, and makes important contributions to numerous contemporary discussions ... His is a book that can and ought to be read, reread, and studied with continuing benefit. * Heidi Ravven, The Jewish Quarterly Review, LXXIX nos3-4 1999 * The book contains several interesting analyses that a critical reader may find useful, and is unquestionably successful in reawakening the problem of the relationship between God and the good. * Avi Sagi, Bar-Ilan University, Religious Studies, Vol 33 - 1197 *
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Back cover copy

In God of Abraham, Lenn Goodman expands on his critically acclaimed Monotheism (1981), rejecting and dichotomy between the God of Abraham and the God of the philosophers. He argues that in fact the two are one, and shows how human values can illuminate our idea of God and how the monotheistic idea of God in turn illuminates our moral, social, cultural, aesthetic, and even ritual understanding. Goodman traces the symbiosis of ideas about God and human values to its conceptual roots in the Biblical account of the binding of Isaac, and Abraham's momentous decision to spare Isaac's life and reject the pagan linkage of violence with the holy. Goodman argues that when Abraham separates horror from the holy he purges evil from the idea of the divine and forges the synthesis that will make possible the revelation of the Torah. Thus it becomes possible to integrate human values and human life in emulation of God's unity and goodness. Throughout this study Goodman draws on traditional, philosophical, historical, and anthropological materials, and particularly on a wealth of Jewish sources. He demonstrates how an adequate understanding of the interplay of values with monotheism dissolves many of the longstanding problems of natural theology and ethics and guides us toward a genuinely humanistic moral and social philosophy.
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