A Glossary of Provincial Words Used in Teesdale in the County of Durham

A Glossary of Provincial Words Used in Teesdale in the County of Durham

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...a mixture of barley or oats ground with the husks. MANNER, n. Manure. MANNISH, v. To manage. Car. MARE, a. and adv. More. A. S. mare. Car., W.and C. MARGET, p. n. Margaret. MARROW, v. To match. Car. MARROWS, n. pl. Two alike, fellows. "These gloves are not marrows." Car., Will. Used also in the singular number. MARRY, A term of asseveration, in common use; was originally, in Popish times, a mode of swearing by the Virgin Mary. Car. MARRY COME UP, An exclamation of disdainful surprise. MASSELGIN, n. Maslin, a mixture of wheat and rye. See John., Jam., Car. MASTY, n. Mastiff. Car. MAUMY, a. Mellow. John., Jam. MAUNDERING, a. Listless, idle. Car. MAUT, n. Malt. Car. MAW, . My. MAW, v. To mow. Jam., W. and C. MAWK, n. Maggot. MAWN, p. pa. of mow. Car. MAWT, n. Malt. MAY, n. The flower of the whitethorn. Ak., Car. MAY-GEZZLIN, n. A foolish person. See Br. Pop. Ant. MAY-LAMB, n. The name for a lamb, which is addressed to, and used by, children. MAY-POLE, n. A tall pole dressed up with flowers and flags, round which villagers used to dance on the 1st of May. This festive custom is now obsolete in the North of England. A maypole is still standing in the village of Ovington. See Hone's E. D. B., Brand's Pop.Ant., i, 135; Strutt'sQueen Hoo Hall, W.Irving's Bracebridge Hall, May Day. MAZED, a. Bewildered. "She is moped and mazed ever since her father's death."--Tales of the Crusaders. Skel., Car. MAZELIN, n. A half wit. W. and C. ME, pr. Frequently used for I, as, "Wheah'l gan for t' ball?" "Me." Car. MEAL, n. Denotes the quantity of milk from a cow at one milking; also, the time of milking. A. S. mail. "Each shepherd's daughter with her cleanly peale, Was come a field to milk the morning's meale...".show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656782X
  • 9781236567826