The Glory and the Shame of Britain; An Essay on the Condition and Claims of the Working Classes, Together with the Means of Securing Their Elevation.

The Glory and the Shame of Britain; An Essay on the Condition and Claims of the Working Classes, Together with the Means of Securing Their Elevation.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1849 edition. Excerpt: ...what each individual would do best himself. In how many cases, for example, does the subscription of a guinea to a charitable institution furnish conscience with a dispensation from the necessity of being liberal for a whole year! Every new claim which may be presented is tacitly referred to this standing act of benevolence, and instantly silenced. Like ordinary business transactions, charity is thus done by wholesale, with a similar result in point of cheapness. How many advantages would be gained if private benevolence were to become its own almoner! Not to speak of the pecuniary saving which would result from having a less amount of charitable machinery to keep in operation, what costly blessings would be conferred both on the recipient and the giver! It is one thing to be relieved by the officer of a public institution, who is paid for doing it, and another to receive help direct from the hand of a disinterested friend. In the former case an emotion of joy is experienced, but no sense of personal obligation enters into it, and for moral purposes it is useless; while in the latter the feeling awakened is strong and definite--the expression of personal sympathy has caused the tenderest chords within the soul to vibrate, and fixed itself in pleasurable reminiscences and grateful resolves. Nor would a less advantage accrue to the giver: "Blessed is the man that considered the poor." Converse with the destitute is healthful; it brings into action a class of sensibilities whose influence is highly necessary for the purpose of discipline, furnishes a salutary check to the growth of indifference and pride, and opens to us a source of the purest pleasure. To be charitable by proxy is to make ourselves strangers to half "the luxury of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236562887
  • 9781236562883