The Global Justice Reader

The Global Justice Reader

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Description

The Global Justice Reader is a first-of-its kind collection that brings together key foundational and contemporary writings on this important topic in moral and political philosophy. * Brings together key foundational and contemporary writings on this important topic in moral and political philosophy * Offers a brief introduction followed by important readings on subjects ranging from sovereignty, human rights, and nationalism to global poverty, terrorism, and international environmental justice * Presents the writings of key figures in the field, including Thomas Hobbes, Immanuel Kant, John Rawls, Thomas Pogge, Peter Singer, and many others
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Product details

  • Paperback | 764 pages
  • 169 x 252 x 41mm | 1,248g
  • Wiley-Blackwell (an imprint of John Wiley & Sons Ltd)
  • Chicester, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1405169648
  • 9781405169646
  • 363,640

Back cover copy

The Global Justice Reader is a first-of-its kind collection that brings together key foundational and contemporary writings on this key topic in moral and political philosophy. Designed for course use, and organized thematically, each section of the text offers a brief introduction followed by important readings on subjects ranging from sovereignty, human rights, and nationalism to global poverty, terrorism, and international environmental justice. Key seminal works from Thomas Hobbes, Immanuel Kant, and John Rawls are included alongside important contemporary writings from a cast of leading thinkers in the field.
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Table of contents

Preface. Acknowledgments. Introduction. PART I: Sovereignty:. Introduction 2. 1. Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes. 2. A State of Nature: Charles R. Beitz. 3. Cosmopolitanism and Sovereignty: Thomas W. Pogge. PART II: Rights to Self-Determination:. Introduction. 4. National Self-Determination: Avishai Margalit and Joseph Raz. 5. Theories of Secession: Allen Buchanan. PART III: Human Rights:. Introduction. 6. Universal Declaration of Human Rights: United Nations. 7. The Nature of Rights: Leif Wenar. 8. Human Rights as a Common Concern: Charles R. Beitz. 9. Group Rights and Group Oppression: Peter Jones. 10. What's Wrong with Torture?: David Sussman. PART IV: Rawls's The Law of Peoples:. Introduction. 11. The Law of Peoples: John Rawls. 12. An Egalitarian Law of Peoples: Thomas W. Pogge. PART V: Nationalism and Patriotism:. Introduction. 13. What is so Special about our Fellow Countrymen?: Robert E. Goodin. 14. The Ethics of Nationality: David Miller. 15. Patriotism and Cosmopolitanism: Martha C. Nussbaum. PART VI: Cosmopolitanism:. Introduction. 16. Perpetual Peace: Immanuel Kant. 17. Kant's Idea of Perpetual Peace, with the Benefit of Two Hundred Years' Hindsight: Jurgen Habermas. 18. Moral Universalism and Global Economic Justice: Thomas W. Pogge. PART VII: Global Poverty and International Distributive Justice:. Introduction. 19. Famine, Affluence, and Morality: Peter Singer. 20. What We Owe to Distant Others: Leif Wenar. 21. The Problem of Global Justice: Thomas Nagel. 22. Eradicating Systemic Poverty: Brief for a Global Resources Dividend: Thomas W. Pogge. 23. Poverty Relief, Global Institutions, and the Problem of Compliance: Lisa L. Fuller. PART VIII: Just War:. Introduction. 24. War, Sedition, and Killing: St. Thomas Aquinas. 25. A Few Words on Non-Intervention: John Stuart Mill. 26. Charter, Chapter VII: United Nations. 27. War and Massacre: Thomas Nagel. 28. Anticipations: Michael Walzer. 29. Just Cause for War: Jeff McMahan. PART IX: Terrorism:. Introduction. 30. Noncombatant Immunity and Military Necessity: Michael Walzer. 31. Terrorism without Intention: David Rodin. 32. Terrorism, Justification, and Illusion: Saul Smilansky. PART X: Women and Global Justice:. Introduction. 33. Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?: Susan Moller Okin. 34. Capabilities as Fundamental Entitlements: Sen and Social Justice: Martha C. Nussbaum. 35. The Role of Religion: Martha C. Nussbaum. 36. Conceptualizing Women's Human Rights: Carol C. Gould. PART XI: International Environmental Justice:. Introduction. 37. One Atmosphere: Peter Singer. 38. Cosmopolitan Justice, Responsibility, and Global Climate Change: Simon Caney. Bibliography. Index
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Review quote

"This compilation fills a gap in the market and will serve as a very useful introduction to a course text." (Political Studies Review, May 2009)
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About Thom Brooks

Thom Brooks is Reader in Political and Legal Philosophy at the University of Newcastle and founding editor of the Journal of Moral Philosophy. He is the author of Hegel's Political Philosophy (2007) and Punishment (2008), as well as editor of Rousseau and Law (2005), Locke and Law (2006), and co-editor of The Legacy of John Rawls (2005).
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Rating details

25 ratings
3.8 out of 5 stars
5 12% (3)
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3 32% (8)
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