Gibbons V. Ogden

Gibbons V. Ogden

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Gibbons v. Ogden, 22 U.S. 1, was a landmark decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that the power to regulate interstate commerce was granted to Congress by the Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution. The case was argued by some of America's most admired and capable attorneys at the time. Exiled Irish patriot Thomas Addis Emmet and Thomas J. Oakley argued for Ogden, while William Wirt and Daniel Webster argued for Gibbons. The acts of the Legislature of the State of New York granted to Robert R. Livingston and Robert Fulton the exclusive navigation of all the waters within the jurisdiction of that State, with boats moved by fire or steam, for a term of years. Livingston and Fulton granted a license to Aaron Ogden. Thomas Gibbons operated a competing steamboat service between Elizabethtown, New Jersey, and New York City that had been licensed by the United States Congress in regulating the coasting tradeshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 9mm | 231g
  • Cel Publishing
  • United States
  • English
  • 6134947660
  • 9786134947664