Germination in Its Electrical Aspect; A Conservative Account of the Electro-Physiological Processes Concerned in Evolution, from the Formation of the Pollen-Grain, to the Completed Structure of the Seedling, Together with Some Further

Germination in Its Electrical Aspect; A Conservative Account of the Electro-Physiological Processes Concerned in Evolution, from the Formation of the Pollen-Grain, to the Completed Structure of the Seedling, Together with Some Further

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...and no perceptible shrinkage; the slightly narrowed shape of the seed owing to the further growth of the cotyledons. The following sketch will show the growth to which I refer. It is desirable to mention that all the potted seeds were negatively charged, because the soil in the pot took its charge from the positive air so that the polarity of the plant was reversed and I have said that plants grown under such conditions are not grown naturally. In the greenhouse they were, no doubt, cut off to some extent from vitalising air, and allowance must be made for that, but the doors and lights of the greenhouse were open when the weather permitted and the pots were placed in a position where they got ample light. We may now compare those grown in the open ground with the pot seedlings. Open Ground Seed. I dug up one that had been sown horizontally. The root had descended too deeply to be got up in its entirety, so that I could not determine the length of the radicle, but the seedling was unusually interesting from the fact that a plumule and radicle had grown from each half of the seed, while the seed itself had not suffered any diminution of size. As will be seen from the drawings, each half of the seed had subdivided itself into two; the radicle and plumule being attached to a quarter instead of to half a seed, but in exactly the same way that I have previously described. The larger plumule bore nine leaves and the smaller, which was red in colour, leaf buds only. Although, measured from the upper surface of the seed, the first was only 4-inches in height, it exhibited a distinctly hard, woody and vigorous radicle and its seed substance was almost normal; that of the second being darker in hue. The following sketch is of the seedling before removal of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 50 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 109g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236609131
  • 9781236609137