German Pronunciation; Practice and Theory. the Best German--German Sounds, and How They Are Represented in Spelling--The Letters of the Alphabet, and

German Pronunciation; Practice and Theory. the Best German--German Sounds, and How They Are Represented in Spelling--The Letters of the Alphabet, and

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 edition. Excerpt: ...This consonant, the so-called 'VcA-Laut," is formed between the front of the tongue and the middle of the hard palate, in the same place where the vowel i is articulated. It is not a regular English consonant, but sometimes occurs as the initial sound of hue, hew, etc. In German, we have the two spellings: --1. ch, after front vowels, and after consonants; e. g. ich hq, I, solch zolcj, such; also initial ch in many foreign words; e. g. Charon a: ron (proper name). 2. g final, after front vowels, and after consonants (used alternatively with k, see page 53); e. g. Sieg zi: cj, victory, Berg bercj, mountain. The suffix-ig, as in Kimig, king, is pronounced 15 by many speakers who generally use k for-g. In certain districts, this sound approaches J, especially English J, for which see page 46. In good pronunciation, the two sounds are kept distinct. Instead of c, in the North-East the back continuant x is used before back vowels, as in Charon. 1. Take care to keep cj distinct as well from J as from the back-continuant or "acA-Laut," x, which is quite a different sound. Compare the diagram at page 37, and the remarks on x, page 58. 2. Pronounce final g after front vowels, etc., either exactly the same as le, or exactly the same as ch in ich, i. e. as a sharp voiceless consonant, and not as a voiced, or half-voiced one, as Englishmen are inclined to do. Final 9L or UL or gj, although not unfrequently insisted upon by professors of singing and elocution, and prescribed in their text-books, are undoubtedly wrong, being in direct contradiction to the general sound-law that voiced consonants (except liquids and nasals), when terminating a word, become voiceless. Front-continuant-Voice, j, --Same sound, flat and voiced. English y in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236559568
  • 9781236559562