Geology of the Thousand Islands Region; Alexandria Bay, Cape Vincent, Clayton, Grindstone and Theresa Quadrangles Volume 145-146

Geology of the Thousand Islands Region; Alexandria Bay, Cape Vincent, Clayton, Grindstone and Theresa Quadrangles Volume 145-146

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...foliation of the crude type which proclaims the rock a gneiss, rather than a schist. The foliation structure of thc granite gneiss conforms werywlzere in dip and strike to that of the adjacent Grenville rocks. /Vhile this by no means excludes the possibility that the Grenville rocks may have been compressed and foliated prior to the intrusion of the granite, it does demonstrate that both sets of rocks have undergone compression in common, subsequent to this intrusion. It is quite possible that much of'this compression was a result of the_ actual intrusion, and that the granite gneiss actually solidified with a foliated structure. This is not at all uncommon in great bathylithic intrusions, which, in order to make a place for themselves, must endeavor to shoulder aside the rocks previously occupying the space. This shouldering pressure exerted on the adjacent rocks under bathylithic, or deep seated, conditions, that is with a thick cover of overlying rocks, tends to give the rocks thus compressed a foliation which parallels the margins of the bathylith, and hence boxes the compass in direction. At the same time the rock of the bathylith, while solidifying, may develop a similar and parallel foliation. Vhile it can not be affirmed that such results were not brought about in the region, it can be positively stated that, if so, they have been so disguised by subsequent compressive stresses that the effects of the two can not now be successfully disentangled. This is shown in several ways: (a) the microscopic study of the granite gneiss indicates that, to a considerable extent at least, its foliation is due to recrystallization rather than to original crystallization, in other words the rock has been much crushed and somewhat recrystallized...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236922077
  • 9781236922076