The Geology of the Oil Regions of Warren, Venango, Clarion, and Butler Counties; Including Surveys of the Garland and Panama Conglomerates in Warren and Crawford, and in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., Descriptions of Oil Well Rigs and Tools, and a

The Geology of the Oil Regions of Warren, Venango, Clarion, and Butler Counties; Including Surveys of the Garland and Panama Conglomerates in Warren and Crawford, and in Chautauqua Co., N.Y., Descriptions of Oil Well Rigs and Tools, and a

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...the nearest boring that taps a spring or well, but the one that happens to strike the same water lead in the rock. The points of interference are sometimes one hundred rods apart. 446. In every new oil development on high ground, one of the first effects noticed is a diminution in quantity or a total failure of the normal water supply in springs and wells. The shallow wells of the country, dug only to the first sand beneath the surface, soon fail, and a permanent supply of water can now be obtained only from sandrocks lying at a lower horizon. It then becomes necessary also to drill wells to furnish the water required for the purposes of steam. These holes are drilled in the derrick, about three feet from the oil well and are usually from 200 to 300 feet deep, (see Plate XIV.) They sometimes go dry, however, for when the deep oil hole is opened below the level of the sandrock supplying them with water, the fluid may flow into it, follow on down and pass out through a lower rock as mentioned above. The remedy in such cases is to drill the water well doep into the slates or shales below the sandrock so that it may have a pocket to collect and hold the water coming into it. There are seldom any fissures or water courses in these compact shales to furnish a communication from one well to the other, although they are generally only about three feet apart. 447. Below the fresh water-bearing rocks the crevices are quite infrequent and smaller, as a general rule. Still there appear to be localities, where, judging from the heavy flows of salt water, quite extensive fissures exist in some of the lower sandstones, as at Pittsburgh, Sharpsburg and other places which might be mentioned. When the flow of salt water is not so copious and is...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 156 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 290g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656720X
  • 9781236567208