A Geological Survey of the Yorkshire Coast; Describing the Strata and Fossils Occurring Between the Humber and the Tees, from the German Ocean to Th

A Geological Survey of the Yorkshire Coast; Describing the Strata and Fossils Occurring Between the Humber and the Tees, from the German Ocean to Th

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1828 edition. Excerpt: ...petrified state; yet there are groups of long cylindrical bodies, found in great quantities on this coast, bearing a striking resemblance to the stalks of the common tangle, and often appearing in pairs, as these stalks are wont to grow. Like these stalks, they have a brown coating; and the appearance of brown leaves among them, or of a brown substance tht may have been formed of the leaves, strengthens the analogy. The cross section of the petrifaction has also, in some instances, a resemblance to that of the plant, displaying the same concentric zones; but the petrified bodies are seen, in some places, to run into one another, or to be connected by lateral communications, such as we do not know to exist in any species of the recent plant. These petrifactions may be seen in their most perfect state, in a recess on the shore between Runswick and Staiths. They lie in a kind of beds or seams, covering some of the bands of ironstone which we have named the Kettleness beds. They are found in similar situations in other parts of the coast. We also meet with them in the ferruginous sandstone of the Scarborough and Cayton shores, and in some of the hard sandstone beds at Filey Bridge. The existence of iron in most places where these remains are found, may occasion some doubt as to their vegetable origin. It has been already remarked, that metallic solutions often assume arborescent forms, and we know that depositions of iron at chalybeate springs are sometimes curiously ramified, and that ferruginous matter frequently sinks down in clayey beds, where it hardens in the form of roots of shrubs: but the bodies now under consideration seem far too uniform in their size, shape, and arrangement, to admit the supposition of their having been...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 130 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 245g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236584376
  • 9781236584373