Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man Made Landscape
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Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man Made Landscape

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Eighty percent of everything ever built in America has been built since the end of World War II. This tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside is not simply an expression of our economic predicament, but in large part a cause. It is the everyday environment where most Americans live and work, and it represents a gathering calamity whose effects we have hardly begun to measure. In The Geography of Nowhere, James Howard Kunstler traces America's evolution from a nation of Main Streets and coherent communities to a land where everyplace is like noplace in particular, where the city is a dead zone and the countryside a wasteland of cars and blacktop. Now that the great suburban build-out is over, Kunstler argues, we are stuck with the consequences: a national living arrangement that destroys civic life while imposing enormous social costs and economic burdens. Kunstler explains how our present zoning laws impoverish the life of our communities, and how all our efforts to make automobiles happy have resulted in making human beings miserable. He shows how common building regulations have led to a crisis in affordable housing, and why street crime is directly related to our traditional disregard for the public realm. Kunstler takes the reader on a historical journey to understand how Americans came to view their landscape as a commodity for exploitation rather than a social resource. He explains why our towns and cities came to be wounded by the abstract dogmas of Modernism, and reveals the paradox of a people who yearn for places worthy of their affection, yet bend their efforts in an economic enterprise ofdestruction that degrades and defaces what they most deeply desire. Kunstler proposes sensible remedies for this American crisis of landscape and townscape: a return to sound principles of planning and the lost art of good place-making, an end to the tyranny of compulsive commuting, the unshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 304 pages
  • 137.16 x 210.82 x 22.86mm | 249.47g
  • Simon & Schuster Ltd
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0671888250
  • 9780671888251
  • 129,941

Review quote

Michiko Kakutani"The New York Times"Provocative and entertaining. Bill McKibbenauthor of "The End of Nature"A Funny, Angry, Colossally Important Tour of Our Built Landscape, Our Human Ecology. "The New Yorker"A serious attempt to point out ways future builders can avoid the errors that have marred the American landscape. James G. Garrison"The Christian Science Monitor"Contributes to a discussion our society must hold if we are to shape our world as it continues to change at a dizzying pace. Robert Taylor"Boston Globe"A wonderfully entertaining useful and provocative account of the American environment by the auto, suburban developers, purblind zoning and corporate pirates. Robert Taylor "Boston Globe" A wonderfully entertaining useful and provocative account of the American environment by the auto, suburban developers, purblind zoning and corporate pirates. Bill McKibben author of "The End of Nature" A Funny, Angry, Colossally Important Tour of Our Built Landscape, Our Human Ecology. "The New Yorker" A serious attempt to point out ways future builders can avoid the errors that have marred the American landscape. James G. Garrison "The Christian Science Monitor" Contributes to a discussion our society must hold if we are to shape our world as it continues to change at a dizzying pace. Michiko Kakutani "The New York Times" Provocative and entertaining. Michiko Kakutani The New York Times Provocative and entertaining. James G. Garrison The Christian Science Monitor Contributes to a discussion our society must hold if we are to shape our world as it continues to change at a dizzying pace. The New Yorker A serious attempt to point out ways future builders can avoid the errors that have marred the American landscape. Bill McKibben author of The End of Nature A Funny, Angry, Colossally Important Tour of Our Built Landscape, Our Human Ecology. Robert Taylor Boston Globe A wonderfully entertaining useful and provocative account of the American environment by the auto, suburban developers, purblind zoning and corporate pirates. "The New Yorker"A serious attempt to point out ways future builders can avoid the errors that have marred the American landscape. James G. Garrison"The Christian Science Monitor"Contributes to a discussion our society must hold if we are to shape our world as it continues to change at a dizzying pace. Bill McKibbenauthor of "The End of Nature"A Funny, Angry, Colossally Important Tour of Our Built Landscape, Our Human Ecology. Michiko Kakutani"The New York Times"Provocative and entertaining. Robert Taylor"Boston Globe"A wonderfully entertaining useful and provocative account of the American environment by the auto, suburban developers, purblind zoning and corporate pirates.show more

About James Howard Kunstler

James Howard Kunstler is the author of eight novels. He has worked as a newspaper reporter and an editor for Rolling Stone, and is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Sunday Magazine. He lives in upstate New York.show more

Rating details

2,770 ratings
4.05 out of 5 stars
5 35% (968)
4 41% (1,129)
3 20% (546)
2 4% (99)
1 1% (28)
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