The Geographical System of Herodotus, Examined and Explained, by a Comparison with Those of Other Ancient Authors and with Modern Geography Etc

The Geographical System of Herodotus, Examined and Explained, by a Comparison with Those of Other Ancient Authors and with Modern Geography Etc

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1800 edition. Excerpt: ... built of burnt bricks, laid in bitumen. (Xenophon Anab. lib. ii.) and the walls of Perisabour, in Babylonia, taken by Julian, were of the same materials: (Amm. Marc. lib. xxiv.) So that in those days, bitumen was much in use ai a cement; but it appears to have been disused in succeeding times. None appears in the ruins of Ctesiphon, or in Bagdad. 1 slight; in contradistinction to pucca, or strong; which latter term is applied to masonry, built wholly with lime cement. The cutcha walls are made much thicker than the pucca; and if plastered over, and kept dry at the top, will bear the requisite pressure, and stand as well, perhaps too, as long, as those built with lime mortar of the country; which, by the bye, is some of the strongest in the world. Moreover, few countries have so great a quantity of rain, as Bengal; few less than Babylonia. The nature of the mortar used in the ancient fabrics seen by Delia Valle and by Ives proves that the Babylonians built with clay mortar, as is practised by the Bengal people; and by thosexf Bagdad, the modern Babylon. And this reminds us of a passage in Genesis (chap. xi. ver. 3.) relating to the building of the tower of Babel, (which might possibly have been a part of the original city of Babylon; perhaps the very tower of Belus, so often mentioned, before it took the form described above.) It says, " they had brick for stone, and slime for mortar." Now, is not this particularly descriptive of one of the modes of building, in Babylonia; and which, in essentials, resembles the Bengal cutcha? The bricks used in the Bengal cutcha, having been originally well burnt, and afterwards easily separated, are equal in quality to new bricks: and therefore are";equally valuable, in the construction of other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 268 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 485g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236592530
  • 9781236592538