The Gentleman's House; Or, How to Plan English Residences, from the Parsonage to the Palace with Tables of Accomodation and Cost, and a Series of Sele

The Gentleman's House; Or, How to Plan English Residences, from the Parsonage to the Palace with Tables of Accomodation and Cost, and a Series of Sele

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1865 edition. Excerpt: ... special Dinner-Stair (or by adapting the Men-servants' Stair to the purpose), or by using a Lift; the transmission of smells, however, may possibly be increased by such means, and the plan of the external Kitchen door is still well worthy of consideration. (Plate XXXVII.) Again, with a Basement-Kitchen we have to avoid the placing of its windows under those of any room where the smells will be unwelcome, --as also the placing of the kitchen itself under any room where its heat will be unwelcome; the hood over the cooking-apparatus is especially necessary. As the position of the Kitchen governs the arrangement of its accessories, --Scullery, Ladders, &C., --it need only be remarked here that all these must be kept in view in determining such position. The relations which they bear to the Kitchen will be treated of in dealing with them in their order. The relations of other Offices to the Kitchen will be taken up in the same way in the chapters on the Servants'-Hall, Housekeeper's-room, Steward's-room, Still-room, &C., and in the chapter on Thoroughfares and General Plan. In some of the largest houses there is provided, as separate from the Cooking-Kitchen, an apartment under the name of Outer-Kitchen. There is no Still-room (which see) in such a case; this apartment being made to serve all its purposes, and others of like character, the making of the pastry for example. Here also the lady of the house may come to confer with the cook or to give directions in respect of the kitchen department. The fixtures and furniture will be very nearly such as are usual in the Housekeeper's-room (which see), with a dresser and centre table, and perhaps rails for dishcovers, the copper vessels being left in the Cooking-Kitchen. The Cook's-Room (see thisshow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 180 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 331g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United Kingdom
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236590449
  • 9781236590442