The Genius and Life of Poe, by R.H. Stoddard. Edgar Allan Poe, by James Russell Lowell. Death of Edgar A. Poe, by N.P. Willis. the Poetic Principle. the Rationale of Verse. Miscellaneous Poems. Poems Written in Youth

The Genius and Life of Poe, by R.H. Stoddard. Edgar Allan Poe, by James Russell Lowell. Death of Edgar A. Poe, by N.P. Willis. the Poetic Principle. the Rationale of Verse. Miscellaneous Poems. Poems Written in Youth

By (author) 

List price: US$20.96

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ...with which we had prefaced it in this paper. It will throw light on his sane character to give a literal copy of the note: "Fordham, April 20, 1849. "My Dear Willis: --The poem which I enclose, and which I am so vain as to hope you will like, in some respects, has been just published in a paper for which sheer necessity compels me to write now and then. It pays well, as times go; but unquestionably it ought to pay ten prices, for whatever I send it I feel I am consigning to the tomb of the Capulets. The verses accompanying this may I beg you to take out of the tomb and bring them to light in the Home Journal? If you can oblige me so far as to copy them, I do not think it will be necessary to say ' From the, --that would be too bad;--and, perhaps, 'From a late paper ' would do. "I have not forgotten how a ' good word in season' from you made ' The Raven ' and made 'Ulalume ' (which, by the way, people have done me the honor of attributing to you), therefore I would ask you (if I dared) to say something of these lines--if they please you. "Truly yours ever, "Edgar A. Poe." In double proof--of his earnest disposition to do the best for himself, and of the trustful and grateful nature which has been denied him--we give another of the only three of his notes which we chance to retain: "Fordham, January 22, 1848. "My Dear Mr. Willis: --I am about to make an effort at reestablishing myself in the literary world, and feel that I may depend upon your aid. "My general aim is to start a magazine, to be called ' The Stylus'; but it would be useless to me, even when established, if not entirely out of the control of a publisher. I mean, therefore, to get up a Journal which shall be my own at all points. With this end...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236595408
  • 9781236595409