A General View of the History of Switzerland; With a Particular Account of the Origin and Accomplishment of the Late Swiss Revolution

A General View of the History of Switzerland; With a Particular Account of the Origin and Accomplishment of the Late Swiss Revolution

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1799 edition. Excerpt: ... mountains covered with excellent Pasture, and watered by several small rivers. Itcontained fix churches. The streets were large, and the houses neatly built, and clean looking. Its flourishing state was owing to the uncommon industry of the inhabitants, and to C ci an an extenfive commerce, arifing from the manu. facture of linen and muflin. Their cotton was spun with the common wheel, and. bleached in a large field adjacent to the town. The arts and sciences were much cultivated by the citizens; and they were possessed of an excellent library. The territory of Bienne is fituated at the eastern extremity of the lake of that name, at the foot of the Jura mountains, and surrounded by the cantons of Berne and Soleure, the bishopric of Bafil, and the principality of Neuchatel. The extent of the district is fix miles square, and it contained 7ooo inhabitants. The town lies at the foot of theJura, at a little distance from the lake, the borders ofwhich are highly pleafing and picturesque. ' ' The Bishop of Bafil was the sovereign of this state. He received, upon his promotion to the bishopric, the homage of the citizens and militia of the town, with all the apparent ceremonials of the most absolute submisfion. In his absence he was represented by a mayor of his own appointing; whose power and office confisted in convoking and prefiding in the little council as the chief court ofjustice, in collecting the suffrages, and declaring the entence, but without giving any vote himself. Although justice was 'carried on and executed in the name of the bishop; yet neither that prince nor the mayor had the ' prerogative prerogative of pardoning criminals, or of mitigating the sentence. All causes, both civil and criminal, were first brought before this...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236883888
  • 9781236883889