A General and Introductory View of Professor Kant's Principles Concerning Man, the World and the Deity, Submitted to the Consideration of the Learned

A General and Introductory View of Professor Kant's Principles Concerning Man, the World and the Deity, Submitted to the Consideration of the Learned

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1796 edition. Excerpt: ...part than lies in the premises. 2. Anti 2.-3Anticipation Analogy of of Apprehension. Experience. Postulate 'of Experimental Reasoning. PRINCIPLE LXVIII. The Principle of all Axioms of Intuition is: That all Intuitions of which we (hall become conscious, must involve a variety capable of being united in our consciousness; that is, must be extended quantities determinable by number. PRINCIPLE LXIX. The Principle of all Anticipation of Apprehension is: That the Reality in an intuition or phenomenon which refers to sensation, must have a degree in time, that is, it must arise in time or fill up a space Pa of of time, otherwise it is nothing to us, it cannot be comprehended in our consciousness. PRINCIPLE LXX. Of the Analogies of Experience the Principle is; That without the idea of a necessary connection between our apprehensions of experimental objects, no experience would be possible. Analogy The First. In all the changes which the Phenomena undergo, the substance remains unaltered, and its Quantum in nature is neither encreascd nor diminished; i. e. every phenomenon must be represented as containing something which remains and something which changes, that is, every pheno, . menon must be considered as a substance which has accidents, or it is not representable at all. These Principles are known, but they are always derived from experience: although they have their feat in the mind alone, and tend to, make experience possible. Analogy Analogy The Second. All events in time must admit of being connected according to the laws of cause and effect, or we can have no experience of them. Analogy The Third. All substances which have co-existence in space, are in continual action and re-action, or whatever phenomena may exist in space, they stand...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236770188
  • 9781236770189