A General History of Music; From the Earliest Ages to the Present Periode to Which Is Prefixed, a Dissertation on the Music of the Ancients Volume 4

A General History of Music; From the Earliest Ages to the Present Periode to Which Is Prefixed, a Dissertation on the Music of the Ancients Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1789 edition. Excerpt: ...has not been printed. The style in which this movement is written is now out of fashion, but the harmony, contrivance, and activity of the several parts will always please real judges of musical composition. The first air: Vorrei poter, fung by Bertolli, is gay and natural. The next scene has no regular air, but fragments of airs, fung by the frantic Orlando. In these, there are fine passages, though designedly incoherent. In the subsequent scene, Strada has a graceful and pleasing air: Cost giujia. After this, Celeste had a gay, spirited, and beautiful air: Amor e qual vento, in which Handel seems to have first ventured at the diminished seventh, the invention of which was afterwards disputed in Italy by the friends of Jomelli and Galuppi b). This is followed by an admirable base song, in Handel's grandest style of writing for a base voice: Sorge infausta. Montagnana, who sung this air, must have had an uncommon compass and agility of voice to do it justice. The divisions in many songs written expressly for his voice are both numerous and rapid, and sometimes extend to two octaves in compass. Handel, in his score, has cancelled many passages in this air, which was orignally much longer than in the printed copy. After this comes a duet: Finchepreside, which is chiefly in dialogue, upon a constantly moving base, and is the most masterly composition in the opera. This duet is followed by an accompanied recitative, which is admirably characteristic of Orlando furiofo; and this is succeeded by a beautiful invocation to fieep: Gia I' ebro mio cig/io, which was fung by Senesino, accompanied by violette marine. This accompaniment was writ h) See account of thi? controversy, Vol. II. p. 164, et seq. Vol. IV. T t ten, ten, according to Handel's own...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 228 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 413g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236651731
  • 9781236651730