The General History of China; Containing a Geographical, Historical, Chronological, Political and Physical Description of the Empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet, Including an Extract and Particular Accaount of Volume N . 1

The General History of China; Containing a Geographical, Historical, Chronological, Political and Physical Description of the Empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet, Including an Extract and Particular Accaount of Volume N . 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1736 edition. Excerpt: ...of a Plain surrounded with Mountains, and has within its District three Cides of the Second Order, and three of the Third, besides several Forts with Garrifons for the Defence of the Country. OF THE CHINESE Monarchy: O R, A Chronological History of the most remarkable Events that hapfend during the Reign of every Emperor. Fo Hi, the First Emperor. E was born in the Province of Chen si, and was chosen on account of his superior Merit to govern his Countrymen, who call'd him Tien tse, that is to fay, Son of Heaven, to denote that he was more favour'd by Heaven than the rest of Mankind, since it was from Heaven he receiv'd those extraordinary Qualities which had raised him to the Throne. At this Time, fays a Chinese Author, Men differ'd but little from Brutes; they knew their Mother, but not not their Father; they liv'd in a favage manner, and fought nothing but to satisfy their Hunger, for as foon as they were filled they threw away the Remains: It was then their Custom to devour every Part of the Animal; thsy alfo drank the Blood, and cloathed themselves with the Skins. Fo hi taught them how to make Nets for Fishing and Fowling, and alfo instructed them to bring up Domestick Animals, as well for Food as for Sacrifices; by these means he provided for the Subsistence of his People. This Prince alfo sketch'd out the eight Koua, find ing that the knotted Cords, which they used instead of Characters, and to instruct their Children, were very unfit to publish his Laws, and to leave to Posterity the Instructions he intended. These Koua are three Lines, which by different Combinations make sixty four; and he drew out these famous Lines for Symbols to express what he desired. These eight Koua, or Symbols of three Lines each, either strait or crooked, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 142 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 268g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236680944
  • 9781236680945