Genealogy of the Dickson Family and Its Immediate Collateral Branches; With Notes on the Scottish Emigration to North Ireland

Genealogy of the Dickson Family and Its Immediate Collateral Branches; With Notes on the Scottish Emigration to North Ireland

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...SOME REMINISCENCES OF MRS. MARY ANN DICKSON ( ), Wr1tten t Her D1ct t1on By Her D ughter R chel. I remember my grandfather McConnell (12 ) as a good old man. The last years of his life were spent in reading his Bible. He was a linen weaver when linen weaving was flourishing in Ireland. My father (6 ) was his only son that survived--his first born. Two brothers died in infancy. My father had five sisters, Marjorie, Margaret, Katherine and Mary Ann, a twin, whose mate died at birth, and for whom I am named. My grandfather died when I was sixteen, and grandmother died in 73 aged 93 years, both in Blantyre, Scotland. At this date five generations were living, George Hopkins, my oldest grandson, being over one year old. My grandfather's age is not known. My grandfather's uncle was an early settler at Red Stone, Penna., now called Brownsville, and I believe the McConnells of Washington County are descendants of this man. I was born in the parish of Blantyre, Lanarkshire, near Bothwell Bridge. You have seen the house on the estate of Craighead near the Clyde River. My father was head gardener of this estate, having served three years in a nobleman's garden in Ireland. I think the Nobleman's name was Montgomery, related to the Montgomery who fell at Quebec. I can remember how my father raised grapes in hot houses, and tomatoes and cucumbers in hot beds. We children would not eat tomatoes at all. My father met Mary Kelly in Blantyre, daughter of a farmer. She was the youngest daughter of a family of four girls and four boys. Their names were Thomas, Patrick, John, Edward, Nancy, Bridget and Mary Kelly. Father was married to Mary Kelly, Oct. 12, 1827, and I was the first born of five children, two..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 190.5 x 238.76 x 7.62mm | 113.4g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236605594
  • 9781236605597