Gene Action

Gene Action : A Historical Account

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Description

As a college student, Werner Maas took a course in genetics in 1941 and wondered why so little was said about the biochemical action of genes in controlling the specific function of an organism. Just at that time, biochemists and geneticists began to investigate jointly the basis of gene action, especially in microorganisms. Thus, Maas was able to witness firsthand the spectacular developments that led in the next twenty-five years to a clear picture of the action of genes. The history of these remarkable discoveries is the core of this book. After 1965, building on insights gained from the work with microorganisms, studies of gene action turned to animals and plants and concentrated on processes not present in microorganisms, such as embryonic development, the role of genes in diseases, and the function of the nervous system. Because of the rapidity of technical advances made in handling genes, it has been possible to learn much about these complex processes. The last part of the book deals with these developments, which are ongoing parts of the history of gene action.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 176 pages
  • 160 x 236.2 x 17.8mm | 385.56g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • New.
  • 10 halftones, 12 line illustrations
  • 0195141318
  • 9780195141313

Review quote

"It was great fun to read this manuscript. The style is charming. The book, although very short, contains a lot of genetic information and reveals, in clear language, the intellectual paths that geneticists have followed in making many of the major scientific discoveries of the past century.It is filled with useful nuggets of genetics history." -Millard Susman, Laboratory of Genetics, University of Wisconsin From reviews of the manuscript: "This is a wonderful book. Maas, now 78, was involved in at least a minor role in the whole development beginning with his first work at Cal Tech in 1946. This permits him to give personal insight into the personalities, temperament, and even physical appearances of the principals." -Victor McKusick, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins Universityshow more

Table of contents

PREFACE; PART I: THE CLASSICAL PERIOD, 1860-1940; PRELUDE; PART II: ONE GENE-ONE ENZYME, 1900-1953; PRELUDE; PART III: HOW GENES DETERMINE PROTEIN STRUCTURE; PRELUDE; PART IV: REGULATION OF GENE ACTION; PRELUDE; PART V: THE AFTERMATH OF THE OPERON MODEL; PRELUDE; APPENDIX/FURTHER READINGSshow more