Gas and Oil Engines and Gas-Producers; A Treatise on Theoretical and Mechanical Developments of the Modern Internal-Combustion Motor, Its Application to the Production of Efficient Power Units, and the Latest Designs of Fuel Producers

Gas and Oil Engines and Gas-Producers; A Treatise on Theoretical and Mechanical Developments of the Modern Internal-Combustion Motor, Its Application to the Production of Efficient Power Units, and the Latest Designs of Fuel Producers

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...In one of the modified Diesel engines, the low-pressure stage of the compressor discharges into storage tanks from which the high-pressure stage draws its air, the amount being regulated by a governor-operated valve to suit the varying charges of oil at each injection. The highpressure air is discharged directly into the injection-valve cage, without the use of an intermediary storage tank. This system has the advantage that the air is stored at low pressure, from 125 to 150 pounds instead of 750 to 1000 pounds, which results in lighter tanks that, with the connecting piping, are more easily kept tight. On the other hand, it is necessary that the high-pressure stage of the compressor should be reliable. IGNITION SYSTEMS Ignition Requirements. For satisfactory action of the engine, the ignition o the explosive mixture must be certain, and must occur haw 160 /a eo 40 o at a definite, predetermined time. In timing the ignition, it has to be recognized that the explosion is not instantaneous, but requires a not inconsiderable period of time to arrive at the maximum, pressure. The actual duration of the explosion depends on the strength of the explosive mixture and on the amount of compression to which it is subjected. The ignition should have lead--that is, should begin before the end of the return or compression stroke, so that the maximum pressure is reached when the crank has just passed the dead center. The amount of lead varies with the speed, strength of mixture, and other conditions. The indicator card a, Fig. 109, is the correct diagram with properly timed ignition. If the ignition is later than this, indicator cards similar to b or c will be obtained, and the engine will do less work and be less efficient. If the ignition is too...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236929381
  • 9781236929389