Gardeners' Chronicle of America Volume 15

Gardeners' Chronicle of America Volume 15

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...with linear verticillate leaves; but they differ extremely in the shape and size of their flowers; some having large tubular corollas of the most brilliant colours, others small insignificant bell-shaped ones. In the memoir of Klotsch in the Linnaw, vol. ix. p. 360., the species will be found described with great minuteness, (p. 212.) Tecoma capensis grows wild, and is also a favourite garden shrub.--Uncaria Burch. The grapple plant, so called from its hook-lobed fruit, is a most desirable plant to introduce into gardens; but though seeds have been sent to Ludwigsburg Garden, at the Cape, they have not yet germinated.--ischium. The species are common wayside plants, and very ornamental.--Nicottana. The common and the Virginian tobacco are almost naturalised as weeds in cultivated ground.--N. fruticosa, by some considered a native of the Cape, has probably been introduced from China.--Datura Stramonium, "the common thorn apple, an extremely virulent poison, is common in many places as a weed, but probably introduced by civilisation. It is equally wild in Europe, Asia, and America."--Physalis pubescens, the Cape gooseberry, is "very common in the neighbourhood of cultivation, but is perhaps not strictly wild."---Plantago lanceolata, the ribgrass plantain, "which has been introduced by Baron Ludwig, is admirably adapted, as Mr. Bowie informs me, for a permanent grass in our arid soil. It resists the greatest drought, and at all seasons presents a wholesome herbage."--Atraphaxis undulata abounds on the mountains round Cape Town, flowering in January and February. Xaurus bullata, our only species, is a tall forest tree, whose fine-grained dark-coloured wood is much used in cabinetwork, under the unpromising name...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 404 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 717g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236772474
  • 9781236772473