The Future of the Cognitive Revolution
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The Future of the Cognitive Revolution

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The model of the mind developed during the twentieth century's so-called "cognitive revolution" - that the mind is analogous to computer software - has recently lost its once virtually unquestioned pre-eminence. Thus we are now faced with the question of whether it it possible to repair this model, or whether we need to reconceive it in fundamental terms and replace it with something different. In this book, 28 leading scholars from various areas of cognitive science present their latest judgments on the future course for this intellectual movement.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 412 pages
  • 154.7 x 232.7 x 29mm | 612.11g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • New
  • line figures and tables
  • 0195103343
  • 9780195103342
  • 2,039,570

Review quote

"The 25 chapters and related introductions in The Future of the Cognitive Revolution provide one of the finest compilations of current issues and perspectives within cognitive science. . . . [It] is written in clear and accessible language intended for a wide audience. The editors, Johnson and Erneling, provide masterful introductions to book sections and a general Introduction and Afterword that help the reader to have an overview and navigate through the book. The book could be used in an upper level undergraduate course or a graduate seminar on cognition, or subsets of chapters could be easily incorporated into graduate seminars in related disciplines. I highly recommend this book for new entrants into cognitive science as well as for seasoned researchers. This book should not be ignored."--Contemporary Psychology"[T]he use of any formal language automatizes and standardizes human thinking. From that point of view, the computer is not a model or a partner for the human mind. It is only an invention that . . . supports human mental skills. If we assume that the chapters presented in parts four and five of The Future of the Cognitive Revolution are something that can influence the mainstream of cognitive science, then we can say that cognitive revolution has a future. This future is the realization that culture together with its psychophysical products . . . constitute the environment of individual minds, that we cannot separate human thought from human action in a particular environment: 'All action involves some amount of awareness, as well as vice versa' (270). Over and above all that, I may say that The Future of the Cognitive Revolution is a consistent collection of more than thirty very good papers written by outstanding authors."--Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences"Instructive and fun. A valuable supplement."--Choice "The 25 chapters and related introductions in The Future of the Cognitive Revolution provide one of the finest compilations of current issues and perspectives within cognitive science. . . . [It] is written in clear and accessible language intended for a wide audience. The editors, Johnson and Erneling, provide masterful introductions to book sections and a general Introduction and Afterword that help the reader to have an overview and navigate through the book. The book could be used in an upper level undergraduate course or a graduate seminar on cognition, or subsets of chapters could be easily incorporated into graduate seminars in related disciplines. I highly recommend this book for new entrants into cognitive science as well as for seasoned researchers. This book should not be ignored."--Contemporary Psychology"[T]he use of any formal language automatizes and standardizes human thinking. From that point of view, the computer is not a model or a partner for the human mind. It is only an invention that . . . supports human mental skills. If we assume that the chapters presented in parts four and five of The Future of the Cognitive Revolution are something that can influence the mainstream of cognitive science, then we can say that cognitive revolution has a future. This future is the realization that culture together with its psychophysical products . . . constitute the environment of individual minds, that we cannot separate human thought from human action in a particular environment: 'All action involves some amount of awareness, as well as vice versa' (270). Over and above all that, I may say that The Future of the Cognitive Revolution is a consistent collection of more than thirty very good papers written by outstanding authors."--Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences"Instructive and fun. A valuable supplement."--Choice "The 25 chapters and related introductions in The Future of the Cognitive Revolution provide one of the finest compilations of current issues and perspectives within cognitive science. . . . [It] is written in clear and accessible language intended for a wide audience. The editors, Johnson and Erneling, provide masterful introductions to book sections and a general Introduction and Afterword that help the reader to have an overview and navigate through the book. The book could be used in an upper level undergraduate course or a graduate seminar on cognition, or subsets of chapters could be easily incorporated into graduate seminars in related disciplines. I highly recommend this book for new entrants into cognitive science as well as for seasoned researchers. This book should not be ignored."--Contemporary Psychology "[T]he use of any formal language automatizes and standardizes human thinking. From that point of view, the computer is not a model or a partner for the human mind. It is only an invention that . . . supports human mental skills. If we assume that the chapters presented in parts four and five of The Future of the Cognitive Revolution are something that can influence the mainstream of cognitive science, then we can say that cognitive revolution has a future. This future is the realization that culture together with its psychophysical products . . . constitute the environment of individual minds, that we cannot separate human thought from human action in a particular environment: 'All action involves some amount of awareness, as well as vice versa' (270). Over and above all that, I may say that The Future of the Cognitive Revolution is a consistent collection of morethan thirty very good papers written by outstanding authors."--Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences "Instructive and fun. A valuable supplement."--Choice "The 25 chapters and related introductions in The Future of the Cognitive Revolution provide one of the finest compilations of current issues and perspectives within cognitive science. . . . [It] is written in clear and accessible language intended for a wide audience. The editors, Johnson and Erneling, provide masterful introductions to book sections and a general Introduction and Afterword that help the reader to have an overview and navigate through the book. The book could be used in an upper level undergraduate course or a graduate seminar on cognition, or subsets of chapters could be easily incorporated into graduate seminars in related disciplines. I highly recommend this book for new entrants into cognitive science as well as for seasoned researchers. This book should not be ignored."--Contemporary Psychology "[T]he use of any formal language automatizes and standardizes human thinking. From that point of view, the computer is not a model or a partner for the human mind. It is only an invention that . . . supports human mental skills. If we assume that the chapters presented in parts four and five of The Future of the Cognitive Revolution are something that can influence the mainstream of cognitive science, then we can say that cognitive revolution has a future. This future is the realization that culture together with its psychophysical products . . . constitute the environment of individual minds, that we cannot separate human thought from human action in a particular environment: 'All action involves some amount of awareness, as well as vice versa' (270). Over and above all that, I may say that The Future of the CognitiveRevolution is a consistent collection of more than thirty very good papers written by outstanding authors."--Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences "Instructive and fun. A valuable supplement."--Choice "The 25 chapters and related introductions in The Future of the Cognitive Revolution provide one of the finest compilations of current issues and perspectives within cognitive science. . . . [It] is written in clear and accessible language intended for a wide audience. The editors, Johnson andErneling, provide masterful introductions to book sections and a general Introduction and Afterword that help the reader to have an overview and navigate through the book. The book could be used in an upper level undergraduate course or a graduate seminar on cognition, or subsets of chapters couldbe easily incorporated into graduate seminars in related disciplines. I highly recommend this book for new entrants into cognitive science as well as for seasoned researchers. This book should not be ignored."--Contemporary Psychology"[T]he use of any formal language automatizes and standardizes human thinking. From that point of view, the computer is not a model or a partner for the human mind. It is only an invention that . . . supports human mental skills. If we assume that the chapters presented in parts four and five of TheFuture of the Cognitive Revolution are something that can influence the mainstream of cognitive science, then we can say that cognitive revolution has a future. This future is the realization that culture together with its psychophysical products . . . constitute the environment of individual minds, that we cannot separate human thought from human action in a particular environment: 'All action involves some amount of awareness, as well as vice versa' (270). Over and above all that, I may say that The Future of the Cognitive Revolution is a consistentcollection of more than thirty very goodpapers written by outstanding authors."--Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences"Instructive and fun. A valuable supplement."--Choiceshow more

Back cover copy

In Reassessing the Cognitive Revolution, leading scholars from diverse fields of cognitive science-linguistics, psychology, neuropsychology, and philosophy-present their latest, carefully considered judgments about the future of this intellectual movement. Jerome Bruner, Noam Chomsky, Hilary Putnam, and Margaret Boden, among others, have written original chapters in a nontechnical style that can be enjoyed and understood by an interdisciplinary audience of psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists, linguists, and cognitive scientists alike.show more

Table of contents

Introduction ; What is the Purported Discipline of Cognitive Science; and Why Does It Need to be Reassessed at the Present Moment?: The Search for "Cognitive Glue" ; Part 1. Good Old-Fashioned Cognitive Science: Does it have a Future? ; Language and Cognition ; Functionalism: Cognitive Science or Science Fiction? a Hilary Putnam ; Reassessing the Cognitive Revolution ; Promise and Achievement in Cognitive Science ; Boden's Middle Way: Viable or Not? ; Metasubjective Processes: the Missing "ILingua Franca of Cognitive Science ; Is Cognitive Science a Discipline? ; Anatomy of a Revolution ; Part 2. Cognitive Science and the Study of Language ; Language from an Internalist Perspective ; The Novelty of Chomsky's Theories ; Buy What Have You Done For Us Lately?: Some Recent Perspectives on Linguistic Nativism ; Part 3. Connectionism: A Non-Rule-Following Rival, or Supplement to the Traditional Approach? ; From Text to Process: Connectionism's Contribution to the Future of Cognitive Science ; Embodied Connectionism ; Neural Networks and Neuroscience: What are Connectionist Simulations Good for? ; Can Wittgenstein Help Free the Mind From Rules? The Philosophical Foundations of Connectionism ; What Might Cognition be if Not Computation? ; Part 4. The Ecological Alternative: Knowledge as Sensitivity to Objectively Existing Facts ; The Future of Cognitive Science: An Ecological Analysis ; The Cognitive Revolution from an Ecological Point of View ; Part 5. Challenges to Cognitive Science: The Cultural Approach ; Will Cognitive Revolutions Ever Stop? ; Neural Cartesianism: Comments on the Epistemology of the Cognitive Sciences ; Language, Action and Mind ; Cognition as a Social Practice: From Computer Power to Word Power ; 'Berkeleyan' Arguments and the Ontology of Cognitive Science ; Part 6. Historical Approaches ; The Mind from an Historical Perspective: Human Cognitive Phylogenesis and the Possibility of Continuing Cognitive Evolution ; Taking the Past Seriously: How History Shows that Eliminativists' Account of Folk Psychology is Partly Right and Partly Wrong ; Afterword ; Cognitive Science and the Future of Psychology - Challenges and Opportunitiesshow more