Fruits and Fruit-Trees, Home and Foreign; An Index to the Kinds Valued in Britain, with Descriptions, Histories, and Other Particulars

Fruits and Fruit-Trees, Home and Foreign; An Index to the Kinds Valued in Britain, with Descriptions, Histories, and Other Particulars

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ...Not that it corresponds in value, or is even made an object of cultivation for the sake alone of the fruit. The berbery serves merely as an elegant addition to the list; it can easily be dispensed with; when absent, it is not missed, but whoever commands a good crop of the ripe fruit is certainly fortunate. As usually seen, though not so tall when wild, it is a bushy shrub, three to six feet in height, with abundance of slender pale brown twigs that nearly conceal the principal stem. Every part is studded with very sharp prickles, from the axils of which rise the obo-vate and serrated leaves, some of them singly, others in clusters. In May come the flowers, individually no larger than peas, but disposed in pretty racemes that hang from the arching twigs like jets of gold. The odour of these is powerful, and to many persons unpleasing. In due time they are followed by long pendulous strings of scarlet berries, shaped like grains of rye, but thrice as large, rounded at the extremities, slightly curved, and intensely but agreeably acid. Many curious botanical particulars pertain to the berbery. The growth, while young, is rapid. After a few years there comes a sudden pause. Shoots and suckers from the base of the plant still make their appearance, but no particular increase takes place in the general dimensions of the plant, and in this condition it remains indefinitely--when undisturbed, it is thought for a possible two or three centuries. At Castle Howard, there is a berbery shaped like a little tree, with a trunk twelve to fifteen inches in diameter! The flowers are, for an exogen, remarkably exceptional, consisting of six sepals and six concave petals, each in two sets, an inner and an outer; the filaments of the six stamens follow the curve of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236660552
  • 9781236660558