The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America, or the Culture, Propagation, and Management on the Garden and Orchard of Fruit Trees Generally; With Descriptions of All the Finest Varieties of Fruit, Native and Foreign, Cultivated in This Country

The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America, or the Culture, Propagation, and Management on the Garden and Orchard of Fruit Trees Generally; With Descriptions of All the Finest Varieties of Fruit, Native and Foreign, Cultivated in This Country

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 edition. Excerpt: ...finding no fruit ready, choose the branches of this tree and the cherry. This observation would seem to be confirmed by the fact that the grubs or larvai of the plum-weevil are frequently found in these warts, and that the beetles have been seen stinging the branches. On the other hand, the following facts are worthy of attention. First, in some parts of the country, where the curculio has been troublesome for many years, the knots have never been known. Secondly, in many cases, the knots have been abundant on plum trees, when the fruit was entirely fair and uninjured by the curculio, even upon the same branches. These facts seem so irreconcilable with the opinion that the curculio produces both these effects, that we rather incline at present to the belief, that though the curculio deposits its eggs in the tumours on the branches while they are yet soft and tender, yet it is not to the curculio, but to some other insect or cause, that we owe this unsightly disease. Practically, however, this is of little account. The experience of many persons, besides ourselves, has proved, most satisfactorily, that it is easy to extirpate this malady, if it is taken in season, and unremittingly pursued. As early as possible in the spring, the whole of the infected trees should be examined, and every branch and twig that shows a tumour, should be cut ott, and immediately burned. Whatever may be the insect, we thus destroy it, and, as experience has taugnt us that the malady spreads rapidly, we will thus effectually prevent its increase. If the trees are considerably attacked by it, it will probably be necessary to go over them again, about the middle of May, but, usually, once a year will be sufficient. If any of the trees are very much covered with...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 278 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 499g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236905776
  • 9781236905772