Fruits of Enterprize Ezhibited in the Adventures of Belzoni in Egypt and Nubia; With an Account of His Discoveries in the Pyramids, Among the Ruins of Cities, and in the Ancient Tombs ...

Fruits of Enterprize Ezhibited in the Adventures of Belzoni in Egypt and Nubia; With an Account of His Discoveries in the Pyramids, Among the Ruins of Cities, and in the Ancient Tombs ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...the evening of the third (lay there was as little prospect of seeing the door as on the first. They became tired at last, and, under some pretence, left the O THE TEMPLE OPENED. 9'7 temple, the sand, and the treasure, contenting themselves with keeping the three hundred piastres, which had unfortunately been paid to them beforehand. Thus deserted, Belzoni and his friends took the resolution to work at the sand themselves. They were only seven: but the crew offered their services, and thus they became fourteen in all. Finding that one of them did as much work as one to five of their selfish workmen, they were well satisfied, and determined to continue. They rose every morning at the dawn of da.y, and left 011' two hours and a half after sun rise. After continuing their operation regularly for some days, they perceived a rough projection from the wall, which apparently indicated that the wdrk was unfinished, and no door to be found there. ' The hopes of some of the party began to fail. Nevertheless, as you did this morning, Bernard, they persevered in their exertions, and completed their work: for, three days afterwards, they discovered a broken cornice, the following day the torus, and of course the frieze under, which made them almost sure of finding the door the next day.-Accordingly Belzoni erected a palisade to keep the sand up, and to his great satisfaction, saw the upper part of the door as the evening approached. They dug away enough sand to be able to enter that night; but supposing theair in the cavity might be unpleasant they deterred this till the following day. Early in the morning of the first of August they went to the temple, in high spirits at the idea of entering a newly-discovered place. They endeavoured to enlarge the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236877160
  • 9781236877161