The Fruit Cultivator's Manual; Containing Ample Directions for the Cultivation of the Most Important Fruits, Including the Cranberry, the Fig, and Grape, with Descriptive Lists of the Most Admired Varieties. and a Calendar Showing the

The Fruit Cultivator's Manual; Containing Ample Directions for the Cultivation of the Most Important Fruits, Including the Cranberry, the Fig, and Grape, with Descriptive Lists of the Most Admired Varieties. and a Calendar Showing the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ... full perfection, and the trees may be injured in their future bearing; for these reasons, when fruit sets too thick, it should be thinned in an early stage of its growth. The Nectarine, as also the Peach tree, is subject to injury by an insect different from the Curculio species, which feeds on the sap beneath the bark, principally near the surface of the earth; but if not checked, will commit ravages on the trunk and root, so as eventually to destioy the tree. The egg is supposed to be first deposited in the upper part of the tree; and in the months of June and July, it becomes a very small maggot, which drops to the ground, and approaches the tree near the surface. If the ground be kept clear around the roots, as it ought always to be, the worm can readily be detected by a small speck of gum, which appears on the tree after it has made its entrance, which gumminess will increase in quantity as it progresses; but if the trees are thoroughly examined about once a week or ten days, and the gum, wherever found, removed by means of a small knife or pointed wire, the worm may be at once defeated from making any havoc on the trees. An orchard of several acres may be kept free from worms by going over it a few times. After a shower of rain is a good time, as the gum can then be more easily discovered; and when it is removed, the wound will soon heal up, and the danger is over, provided the ground be kept cultivated around the trees, and the collar, or that part from which emanate the main roots, be near the surface. This is an important precaution, and should be attended to at the time of transplanting all descriptions of trees and emaller plants; because deep planting prevents the essential circulation of the juices of plants in their regular and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236516044
  • 9781236516046