Frontier Defense on the Upper Ohio, 1777-1778; Compiled from the Draper Manuscripts in the Library of the Wisconsin Historical Society and Pub. at the

Frontier Defense on the Upper Ohio, 1777-1778; Compiled from the Draper Manuscripts in the Library of the Wisconsin Historical Society and Pub. at the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...on Loyalhanna Creek, just west of Laurel Hill. While the advance of the army was encamped there, the enemy attacked them, after having inflicted (Sept. 14, 1758) a severe Capt. John Killbuck & Pipe are gone to Detroit--upon what business Capt. White Eyes can tell you better. They did not desire me to write for them, so I suppose they did not approve of what you proposed to them. The Shawanese--Cornstalk's people, perhaps, will move from their place & come to Cuchachunk this winter. They lately sent messengers who consulted with the chiefs here about that matter; & as no messengers from hence are on their way thither, we shall soon hear what they are resolved to do. Of the Mingoes we have heard nothing since the defeat upon Grant's skirmish line that had penetrated to the neighborhood of Fort Duquesne. The attack upon Ligonier was repulsed, and was the last battle between French and British in this section. A garrison was maintained at this point until after Pontiac's War, when Fort Ligonier was besieged, and relieved with much difficulty. About 1765 the permanent garrison was withdrawn, and in 1766 Capt. Harry Gordon reported that the fort was much shattered and rotting away. He also mentions some inhabitants clustered about the fort. More would come, he says, if right of possession was secured--Hanna, Wilderness Trail, ii, p. 40. In 1769 a land-office was opened at Ligonier and settlers flocked in rapidly. The land on which the fort stood was patented to Gen. Arthur St. Clair. The ravages of the Revolution did not reach the Ligonier Valley until the summer of 1777, when Col. Archibald Lochry set about establishing a stockade fort at Ligonier, probably on the site of the former British fort. This was officially known as Fort...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236595505
  • 9781236595508