From the Tannery to the White House; Story of the Life of Ulysses S. Grant, His Boyhood, Manhood, Public and Private Life and Services

From the Tannery to the White House; Story of the Life of Ulysses S. Grant, His Boyhood, Manhood, Public and Private Life and Services

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...who had not courage enough to fight! The Southern Confederacy was broken; and destruction and desolation were taking the place of thrift and progress. An amusing incident occurred when Longstreet discovered the Union forces on the hills above Lookout Valley, showing how the comic will sometimes mingle with the tragic in war. The Confederate general saw at once that the siege of Chattanooga must be raised if Grant's men were not driven from that position. So in the darkness of the night he attacked them, and a "Severe battle was fought. In the engagement, a large number of mules became frightened, broke from their waggons, and ran furiously towards the enemy, who supposed, in the darkness, that it was a cavalry-charge; and they became panic-stricken and fled. A soldier-poet produced the follow-, ing parody the next day: --" Mules to the right of them, Mules to the left of them, Mules in front of them, Pawed, brayed, and thundered. " Breaking their own confines, Breaking through Longstreet's lines, Into the Georgia troops, Stormed the two hundred. " Wild all their eyes did glare, Whisked all their tails in air, Scattering the ' Chivalry' there, All the world wondered." As soon as the pursuit of the enemy was relinquished, General Grant sent Sherman with his command to relieve Burnside. Longstreet had invested Knoxville with his army, expecting to starve out Burnside; but the brave general did not starve easily. Before Sherman reached Knoxville, Longstreet made a vigorous assault upon Burnside's works, and a severe battle was fought. Longstreet was repulsed with heavy loss. Hearing that the Union army had captured the rebel strongholds at Chattanooga, and that reinforcements were on the way to Burnside, he very wisely raised the siege, and ran away....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123667958X
  • 9781236679581