From the Introduction of Christianity Until the Fall of the Old Hierarchy.- V.2. from the Fall of the Old Hierarchy Until the Death of James VI

From the Introduction of Christianity Until the Fall of the Old Hierarchy.- V.2. from the Fall of the Old Hierarchy Until the Death of James VI

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1888 edition. Excerpt: ...was not yet over for them; and two great European powers showed symptoms of holding out friendly hands in their behalf. France was mediating with England for a truce with Scotland, and Rome with affectionate pity had taken up their cause. When the Pope expostulated with his ungovernable son Edward for encroaching on the rights of the Scottish nation, even that ingenious monarch was. driven into a strait to excuse his behaviour. He de cided, however, to have recourse to what he called the evidence of tradition; and, accordingly, a lengthy and elaborate story was composed by those whose pens were well up to such work, about the ancient supremacy of England over Scotland, which, it was either said or insinuated, had begun in the days of Eli and Samuel! That King Edward really believed in the validity of his claim is undoubted; and this traditional evidence, although vague, confirmed him in a quiet mind, when, in 1300, he set about the reconquest of Scotland. Actual warfare began with the reduction of the Castle of Caerlaverock, in Dumfriesshire. After the capture of this strong fortress, the English were defeated in the Battle of Roslin. These preliminaries being over, fortress after fortress surrendered to Edward, as it had been when he marched against Baliol; but here and there he encountered a desperate resistance, which, when everything else was going on so smoothly, must have been a provoking waste of time. The impregnable walls of the Castle of Brechin stood proof against all the battering engines of the King; and the gallant castellan, Sir Thomas Maule, coolly wiped ofi' with a towel the dust and rubbish which they scattered about his cherished fortress. Before long, however, he received a mortal wound; and, as he lay dying on the, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 108 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 209g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236776453
  • 9781236776457