The French Orthologer; Containing Pronunciation, Etymology, Syntax, French Conversations, Exercises, Questions, Composition, Reading Lessons, and Four General Recapitulation Tables

The French Orthologer; Containing Pronunciation, Etymology, Syntax, French Conversations, Exercises, Questions, Composition, Reading Lessons, and Four General Recapitulation Tables

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...whatever it may be, and in this sense it has a plural number. QUOI QUE, which signifies whatever may be the thing, is always written in two words, to distinguish it from the conjunction, QUoIQUE, though. QUELQUE CHOSE QUE being more agreeable to the ear than QUOI QUE, is often preferred to it; both require the following verb to be put in the subjunctive mood.---(See No. 76.) QUICONQUE, QUELCONQUE, QUOI QUE, QUELQUE CHOSE QUE, QUI QUE CE SOIT, QUOI QUE CE SOIT. " Exterminez, grands Dieux, de la terre ou nous sommes, QUICONQUE avec plaisir repand le sang des hommes." " Great Gods, eaeterminate from the earth rwhich we inhabit, him, whosoever he be, that has pleusure in shedding human blood." Whosoever e pects an unavoidable misfortune may already call himself unhappy. Whichever of you, ladies, shall be bold enough ta slander me, I will cause to repent. There is nothing whatever which can force me to that. There is no woman whatever who can please him. A certain line being given. Two certain points being given. Whatever you do, you will not succeed. V I will serve you whatever it may cost me. Whatever you do, you will not succeed zoilhout friends. f QUI QUE cE sorr refers only to persons; it is masculine and sin-gular, is used with or without a negation, and with or without a preposition. ' Used without a negation it has the same meaning as QUIcoNQuE. QUI or QUE, according as QUI QUE cE son' is subject or object, generally follows, and governs the dependent verb in the subjunctive. See No. 76. Used with a negation, it has the same meaning as PERSONNE. See N0. 72, A, page 4'24. g QUOI QUE CE sorr differs from QUI QUE CE son only in its being applied to things, and not to persons; thus..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 288 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 517g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236805429
  • 9781236805423